ATI Q46/85 Peracetic Acid Monitor

ATI Model Q46/85 is designed for on-line monitoring and control of processes that contain peracetic acid.

Features

  • Available with constant head or sealed flowcell configuration
  • Contact outputs include two programmable control relays for control and alarm modes
  • Communication Options for Profibus-DP, Modbus-RTU, or Ethernet-IP
Your Price Call
Drop ships from manufacturer
ATI
Free Lifetime Tech SupportFree Lifetime Tech Support
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
ATI Q46/85 Peracetic Acid MonitorQ46/85 Peracetic acid monitor
Request Quote
Drop ships from manufacturer

Peracetic acid (PAA) is an extremely strong oxidizer widely used in the food industry for disinfection of piping systems and processing equipment.  It is also used for spray washing of food products, and for disinfection of cooling water systems.  As a disinfecting agent, PAA is often preferred because it produces no harmful breakdown products.  

As with any disinfection system, maintaining proper residual values is the key to effective pathogen control.  To facilitate reliable chemical feed control, ATI has developed an on-line monitor cable of providing real time measurement of low levels of PAA in solution.  The Q46/85 Peracetic Acid Monitor uses a direct sensing polarographic probe.  The probe is typically used in a flowcell, but a submersible sensor is also available.  A permeable diffusion membrane isolates the sensing electrodes from the measured sample, providing long-term stability without electrode fouling problems. The measurement is selective for PAA and is not affected by changes in hydrogen peroxide concentration, which is always present in PAA solutions.

Peracetic acid sensors are amperometric devices isolated from the water by a permeable membrane.  As PAA diffuses through this membrane, it comes in contact with an active electrode and is reduced on the surface.  The net effect is that the sensor generates a current proportional to PAA concentration.  An integral RTD in the sensor provides for automatic temperature compensation, allowing the sensor to operate accurately over a range of 0-50° C.
 
Peracetic acid sensors are capable of operating over a fairly broad concentration range, from a low range of 0-20 PPM up to a high range of 0-2000 PPM.  Systems will operate with good sensitivity down to 0.2 PPM and respond to changes in concentration within about 60 seconds, making them useful for automatic control.

Peracetic Acid sensors require a steady flow of sample across the membrane at the tip of the sensing assembly.  ATI offers options for flowcells, including the standard constant-head overflow system, and a sealed flowcell for pressures up to 50 PSI. For simplicity of installation, complete flow control assemblies are available. Panel assemblies are available with or without a flow switch and can greatly reduce installation time. For open tank installation, a submersible sensor is available. Sample agitation is required as PAA sensors cannot be used in still water.

Questions & Answers
No Questions
Please, mind that only logged in users can submit questions

In The News

A Lesson in Persistence: Taking On Cyanobacteria in Florida

As we hear more and more about algal blooms of different kinds across the United States, teams of scientists are working hard to ensure that they don't become our new normal. One project in Florida is taking a multi-disciplinary approach to the problem—including genetic analysis. The team's work is part of a full-court press in Florida recently, making a serious push to understand what is triggering more frequent blooms. Jose Lopez, Ph.D. , of Nova Southeastern University , the primary investigator on the genetic analysis portion of the project, spoke to EM about the project and his work on it. “This is a very good project,” explains Dr. Lopez. “We're excited about it, and it's a lesson in persistence.” Dr.

Read More

Keeping TABS on the Texas Gulf Coast

From extreme weather such as Hurricane Harvey to spills and other accidents, the Gulf Coast of Texas is no stranger to dangerous situations. This is where the data provided by the Texas Automated Buoy System ( TABS ) comes into the picture. Among the nation's most successful and longest-running coastal ocean-observing systems at the state level, the TABS real-time oceanographic buoy system monitors currents, waves, salinity, winds, and other parameters. Dr. Anthony Knap , director of Geochemical Environmental Research Group (GERG) and a Professor of Oceanography at Texas A&M University, spoke to EM about working with TABS. “TABS has been running now for 24 years,” explains Dr. Knap.

Read More

Watchful Eyes on One of Maine's Crown Jewels: Jordan Pond

Formed by a glacier, Jordan Pond is among Maine's clearest, most beautiful bodies of water. It's also a critical freshwater resource, and watchful eyes are protecting it. EM spoke with Dr. Rachel Fowler, Friends of Acadia's aquatic scientist, about her work monitoring Jordan Pond. A postdoctoral research scientist at the University of Maine, she is a member of a partnership among the National Park Service, the University of Maine Climate Change Institute, and Friends of Acadia that began deploying the Jordan Pond buoy in 2013. Canon provided the initial support for the project. Friends of Acadia is a nonprofit organization that supports different projects in the park.

Read More