ATI Q46/88 Suspended Solids Monitor

ATI’s Model Q46/88 Suspended Solids Monitor provides real time monitoring of suspended solids in a variety of water and wastewater applications.

Features

  • Uses backscatter to allow solids measurements at much higher levels
  • Contact outputs include two programmable control relays for control and alarm modes
  • Communication Options for Profibus-DP, Modbus-RTU, or Ethernet-IP
Your Price Call
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
ATI
Free Lifetime Tech SupportFree Lifetime Tech Support
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
ATI Q46/88 Suspended Solids MonitorQ46/88 Suspended solids monitor
Request Quote
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

ATI’s Model Q46/88 Suspended Solids Monitor provides real time monitoring of suspended solids in a variety of water and wastewater applications. A submersible sensor immersed in process tanks or effluent channel senses particulates in the water using an optical backscatter technique that allows measurement over a wide range. Results are displayed on the Q46 electronic unit mounted near the sensor with a variety of outputs provided as standard.

Monitoring suspended solids in wastewater and industrial process water can be useful for  either process control or for alarming of unusual conditions. In biological treatment systems, monitoring suspended solids in the aeration tank can assist operators in maintaining optimum MLSS (Mixed Liquor Suspended Solids) concentration. In industrial clarifier's, suspended solids water quality monitoring can warn of upset conditions that might result in the discharge of solids that exceed plant permits.

Suspended solids sensors are optical devices operating in the infrared region. Unlike turbidity sensors that use 90 degree scatter to optimize sensitivity, suspended solids sensors use “backscatter” to allow solids measurements at much higher levels. Operation with infrared light ensures very long sensor life and minimizes the effects of changing sample color.

Sensors are designed to withstand the rigorous conditions of wastewater and industrial process streams and to last for years of service with nothing more than occasional cleaning of the sensing surface. There are no protruding surfaces near the sensing element to avoid accumulation of fibrous materials. The sensor is simply pipe mounted using mounting adapters available from ATI.

Optical sensors used for monitoring biologically active systems such as aeration tanks or aerobic digestors will require periodic cleaning to maintain the integrity of the measurement. Biological slime deposited on the optical surface will degrade the ability to transmit IR light into the sample. The frequency of cleaning varies widely depending on the turbulence in the process. Course bubble diffusion systems tend to scour the sensor while fine bubble diffusion systems result in more rapid sensor fouling.
 
Cleaning can be done manually by simply wiping the sensor as needed, but ATI also offers an automatic air-blast cleaning system as an option. The “Q-Blast” air cleaning system is controlled by the Q46/88 Suspended Solids Monitor and provides a compact air compressor system that periodically applies pulses of compressed air across the optical surface to remove accumulated biofouling. This system greatly reduces the requirement for manual maintenance, with cleaning frequency programmed to occur as often as necessary.

Questions & Answers
No Questions
Please, mind that only logged in users can submit questions

In The News

Robotic Fish May Reduce Live Fish Testing Near Hydroelectric Plants

Each year in Germany, as many as 450,000 living fish undergo live animal experiments to test how fish-friendly hydroelectric power plants in the country are. The idea is to discover how readily the fish can move through hydroelectric turbine installations in order to ultimately reduce mortality rates. Of course, subjecting live fish to a potentially deadly test to save others is a bitter irony. And it's one that a team of scientists from the RETERO research project hopes to eventually mitigate with a robotic fish for testing. EM corresponded with Olivier Cleynen and Stefan Hoerner from the University of Magdeburg about the complex flow conditions that set the parameters for the project.

Read More

Mobile HAB Lab, Citizen Scientists Building Awareness

News stories about dogs getting sick from harmful algal blooms (HABs) in lakes have caused worry among members of the public this summer more than once. But Regional Science Consortium (RSC) Executive Director Dr. Jeanette Schnars and a dedicated team are bringing awareness about HABs to the public with the Mobile HAB Lab. “We just launched the HAB Citizen Scientists program this year,” explains Dr. Schnars. “It helps us work with people, especially people who spend time at marinas frequently, that are out there all season long.” The season for boaters at Presque Isle, where RSC is located, starts in mid-May and usually continues through the beginning or middle of October.

Read More

Handheld Cyanotoxin Detection Technology Prototype

In the battle against harmful algal blooms (HABs), time is important . The need for laboratory equipment and testing is a serious challenge for water managers. This issue caught the eye of Qingshan Wei , an assistant professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at North Carolina State University . “Our research group is interested in developing low-cost sensors,” Wei told EM . “Recently we have been developing sensors for environmental monitoring, and cyanotoxins came to our attention .” Cyanobacteria, which generate HABs, are becoming a challenge across the US . They are a very serious problem in North Carolina, in part due to the weather.

Read More