Q46S/66

ATI Q46S/66 Residual Sulfite Monitor

ATI Q46S/66 Residual Sulfite Monitor

Description

ATI's Model Q46S/66 Residual Sulfite Monitor provides the solution to dechlorination control of wastewater effluents.

Features

  • Sulfite ion is measured selectively by conversion to sulfur dioxide
  • Contact outputs include two programmable control relays for control and alarm modes
  • Communication Options for Profibus-DP, Modbus-RTU, or Ethernet-IP
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Details

Dechlorination of wastewater effluent is common practice in many wastewater treatment facilities throughout the U.S.  Strongly reducing sulfur compounds are used to eliminate chlorine residuals that might prove toxic to fish in the receiving stream.  Because residual chlorine discharge limits are often very close to zero, monitoring residual values to comply with regulations has become very difficult, and controlling residuals at values between zero and 10 or 20 parts-per-billion is often not achievable.

To meet stringent discharge limits, the sulfite or bisulfite used for dechlorination is added in slight excess, providing a small sulfite residual to insure complete dechlorination. ATI’s Model Q46S/66 provides operators with a reliable tool for maintaining a small sulfite residual while reducing excess chemical consumption due to overfeed.

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ATI Q46S/66 Residual Sulfite Monitor Q46S/66 Residual sulfite monitor Drop ships from manufacturer

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