150142

Bushnell H2O Series Roof Prism Binoculars

Bushnell H2O Series Roof Prism Binoculars
List Price
$153.95
Your Price
$108.82
In Stock

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H20 Binocular
10X 42MM
Model: 150142

Powerful bright optics in a 100% waterproof package.

ONLY THING WE DIDN'T DO WAS TEACH THEM TO SWIM.
The ultimate on-the-water viewing companions, our ever-popular H20™ binoculars have been enhanced for 2012 with a Soft Texture Grip to keep them on board and in your hands in the most challenging conditions.

Just as before, they're O-ring sealed and nitrogen purged to ensure stunning views no matter how wet they get.

To maximize light transmission and clarity, standard equipment includes multi-coated optics and premium quality BaK-4 prism glass.

From the streamside to the Gulf Stream, the world simply looks better through the Bushnell® H20.

General Features
  • BaK-4 prisms for bright, clear, crisp viewing
  • Multi-coated optics for superior light transmission
  • 100% waterproof: O-ring sealed and nitrogen purged for reliable, fog-free performance
  • Non-slip rubber armor absorbs shock while providing a firm grip
  • Twist-up eyecups
  • Large center-focus knob for easy adjustments
  • Longer eye relief
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Bushnell H2O Series Roof Prism Binoculars 150142 H2O series waterproof/fogproof roof prism binoculars, 10 x 42mm
$108.82
In Stock

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