Davis Long Range Repeater

The Davis Long Range Repeater can extend the transmitting range up to two miles.

Features

  • Charging system is capable of performing continuously even under low light conditions
  • Compatible with Vantage Pro2 and Vantage Vue only
  • Requires two antennas for each long range repeater
List Price $325.00
Your Price $270.84
In Stock
Davis Instruments
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Davis Long Range Repeater7654 Long range repeater with solar power
$270.84
In Stock
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Davis Antennas for Long Range Repeater 7660 Yagi antenna for long range repeater
$149.15
In Stock

Please note: Use of this product requires a pair of external antennas, sold separately.The Long-Range Repeater has a transmitting and a receiving cable, each with an end which will connect to an external antenna. Choose either our large omni directional antenna (#7656), range 1,560' (476 m) in all directions, or our Yagi directional antenna (#7660), range 5,000' (1.5 km) in one direction. You'll need two antennas for each Long-Range Repeater.

  • (1) Solar panel
  • (1) Regulator circuit
  • (1) Rechargeable battery
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