Extech 39272 Pocket Fold-Up Thermometer

The Extech Pocket Fold-Up Thermometer has an adjustable probe with detents of 45º, 90º, 135º and 180º.

Features

  • Very fast response time for on-the-go measuring
  • 4.5" (114mm) stainless steel probe
  • Measures temperatures up to 572F (300C) with 0.1 degree resolution
Your Price $47.29
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
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Extech 39272 Pocket Fold-Up Thermometer39272 Pocket fold-up thermometer with adjustable probe
$47.29
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

The Extech Pocket Fold-Up Thermometer features an adjustable probe a fast response time. On its large LCD display, it's capable of showing time, temperature, time zone, month, week, date, and day. The system will automatically adjust the week, date, day, hour, minute, second, and also for Daylight Savings Time (DST). Other functions include Data Hold, Min/Max, Auto Power Off, and detents at 45, 90, 135, & 180 degrees.

  • Range: -58 to 572F (-50 to 300C)
  • Accuracy: +/-1.8F (-22 to 482F), +/-1C (-30 to 250C)
  • Resolution: 0.1/1
  • Dimensions: 6.1"x2.0"x0.8" (154x50x20mm)
  • Weight: 2.5oz (71g)
  • Warranty: 1 year
  • (1) Thermometer
  • (1) Wrist strap
  • (1) AAA battery
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