Extech Heavy Duty Hot Wire CFM Thermo-Anemometer

The Extech Heavy Duty Hot Wire Anemometer accurately measures air flow (CFM/CMM) or air velocity plus F/C temperature simultaneously.

Features

  • Air velocity measurements as low as 40ft/min
  • Telescoping probe extends up to 3ft (940mm) long
  • Air flow displayed in 2 modes
Your Price $529.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Extech
Government and Educational PricingGovernment and Educational Pricing
Free Lifetime Tech SupportFree Lifetime Tech Support
Free Ground ShippingFree Ground Shipping
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Extech Heavy Duty Hot Wire CFM Thermo-Anemometer407119 Heavy duty hot wire CFM thermo-anemometer
$529.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Extech 407119-NIST Heavy duty hot wire CFM thermo-anemometer, NIST traceable
$654.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Extech Heavy Duty Hot Wire CFM Thermo-Anemometer
407119
Heavy duty hot wire CFM thermo-anemometer
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
$529.00
Extech
407119-NIST
Heavy duty hot wire CFM thermo-anemometer, NIST traceable
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
$654.00

The Extech Heavy Duty Hot Wire Anemometer accurately measures air flow (CFM/CMM) or air velocity plus F/C temperature. It measures air velocity as low as 40ft/min and air flow in 2 modes, as an instantaneous value, or up to 20 point average. The  meter has a telescoping probe that extends up to 3 feet, making it ideal for use in ducts and ventilating systems. Readings are read clearly on the large LCD display. The built-in RS232 interface makes for easy communication using the optional Data Acquisition Software and cable.

  • ft/min range: 40 to 3346ft/min
  • ft/min resolution: 1ft/min
  • ft/min accuracy: +/-(5% + 5 digits)
  • MPH range: 0.5 to 38.0MPH
  • MPH resolution: 0.1MPH
  • knots range: 0.4 to 33.0knots
  • knots resolution: 0.1 knots
  • m/s range: 0.2 to 17.0m/s
  • m/s resolution: 0.1 m/s
  • km/h range: 0.7 to 61.2km/h
  • km/h resolution: 0.1km/h
  • Temperature: 32 to 122F (0 to 50C); 0.1F (0.1 C); +/-1.5F (+/-0.8C)
  • CMM meter3/min range: 0 to 36,000m3/min
  • CMM meter3/min resolution: 0.001 to 1m3/min
  • CMM meter3/min accuracy: 0.001 to 30.0 m2
  • CFM feet3/min range: 0 to 1,271,200ft3/min
  • CFM feet3/min resolution: 0.01 to 100ft3/min
  • CFM feet3/min accuracy: 0.001 to 322.91 ft2
  • (1) Anemometer
  • (1) Telescoping probe with 5.5ft (167.6cm) cable
  • (4) AA batteries
Questions & Answers
No Questions
Please, mind that only logged in users can submit questions

In The News

America’s Elusive Crayfish and the eDNA that’s Finding Them

The Shasta crayfish and signal crayfish are two similar looking arthropods on two very different ecological trajectories. As one spreads in abundance, originating in the Pacific Northwest and spreading throughout the world, the other has been reduced to a handful of remaining populations spread throughout one river and its tributaries.  Pacifastacus leniusculus - the signal crayfish - has met few obstacles in its widely successful expansion from the Pacific Northwest southward in California and Nevada, as well as Europe and Japan. By some expert accounts, it has reached invader status. And while invasive species are rarely good for the surrounding food webs, it’s Pacifastacus fortis - the Shasta crayfish - that’s suffered the most at the signal crayfish’s fortune.

Read More

Low Tech, Low Cost Buoys Coming to Maine’s Shellfish Farmers

What might the Maine Aquaculture Innovation Center’ s (MAIC) buoy offer that other governments and university monitoring equipment lack? The center doesn’t have MicroCAT recorders or autonomous acoustic sensing gliders. It’s not deploying hundred-thousand-dollar oceanographic mooring lines gathering massive amounts of data. So what can MAIC’s three-foot prototype buoy offer that others can’t? It’s easy to clean and costs very little. “One of the big issues for putting anything in the water is biofouling,” said Josh Girgis, an engineer at MAIC based at the University of Maine’s Darling Marine Center (DMC). “If you put a sensor in, you can only expect it to work until something starts growing on it.

Read More

Biochar Adds Filtering Power to Biofilters

Contaminated stormwater threatens a lot of water in the United States. Nearly 50,000 miles of rivers, 760,000 acres of wetlands and one million acres of estuaries are threatened by contaminated stormwater, according to the US Environmental Protection Agency. Those numbers are cited in a review of research recently published in Environmental Science: Water Resource & Technology that looks at one tool for tackling that threat: biochar-augmented biofilters.

Read More