Extech Heavy Duty Hot Wire Thermo-Anemometer

The Extech Heavy Duty Hot Wire Thermo-Anemometer with telescoping probe is designed to fit into small openings.

Features

  • Telescoping probe extends to 7 feet
  • Measures air flow down to 40ft/min (0.2m/s0
  • Large dual LCD display
Your Price $449.99
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Extech
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Extech Heavy Duty Hot Wire Thermo-Anemometer407123 Heavy duty hot wire thermo-anemometer
$449.99
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Extech 407123-NIST Heavy duty hot wire thermo-anemometer, NIST traceable
$574.99
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Extech Heavy Duty Hot Wire Thermo-Anemometer
407123
Heavy duty hot wire thermo-anemometer
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
$449.99
Extech
407123-NIST
Heavy duty hot wire thermo-anemometer, NIST traceable
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
$574.99
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Extech 407001-USB USB Adapter 407001-USB USB adapter used with 407001 Data Acquisition software & serial cable
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Extech 407001-USB USB Adapter
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Extech 153117 117V AC Adapter
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The Extech Heavy Duty Hot Wire Thermo-Anemometer with telescoping probe is designed to fit into small openings such as HVAC ducts and other small vents. The probe extends up to 7ft (2.1 m) with cable. Air flow can be measured down to 40ft/min (0.2m/s). It can record and recall MIN, MAX, and data hold readings. These readings can be read clearly on the large 1.4" (36mm) dual LCD display.

  • Ranges (Max Resolution)
  • ft/min: 40 to 3940 (10)
  • m/s: 0.2 to 20 (0.1)
  • km/h: 0.7 to 72 (0.1)
  • MPH: 0.5 to 45 (0.1)
  • knots: 1.0 to 31 (0.1)
  • Temperature & Windchill F/C
  • 32 to 122 F (0.1) / 0 to 50 C (0.1)
  • Basic Accuracy
  • +/- 3% rdg or +/- (1%+1d)FS
  • +/- 1.5 F (+/- 0.8 C)
  • Dimensions
  • 7x2.9x1.3" (178x74x33mm)
  • 0.5" (13mm)D
  • Weight: 17oz (482g)
  • Warranty: 3 years/CE
  • (1) Anemometer
  • (1) Telescoping probe with cable
  • (6) AAA batteries
  • (1) protective holster
Questions & Answers
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