407744

Extech Sound Calibrators

Extech Sound Calibrators

Description

The Extech Sound Calibrator calibrates and verifies sound level meter operation.

Features

  • For use on Sound Level Meters with 0.5" or 1.0" microphones
  • Total Harmonic Distortion (THD)
  • Durable die-cast, aluminum housing
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$329.99
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

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Details

The Extech Sound Calibrator calibrates and verifies sound level meter operation for meters with 0.5" or 1.0" microphones. Model 407744 features a 1kHz sine wave at 94kb that is generated to an accuracy of 5% (frequency) and ±0.8dB. Model 407766 features a level position to select 94dB or 114dB and an LED indicator light when power is on.

Notable Specifications:
  • Frequency: 1000 Hz +/-5%
  • Sound pressure level: 94 dB (407744); 94dB/114dB (407766) +/-0.5dB (94dB), +/-1dB (114dB)
  • Distortion:< 2% total harmonic distortion (THD)
  • Operating temperature: 32 to 122F (0 to 50C)
  • Power supply: two heavy duty, alkaline 9V Battery
  • Power consumption: approx. 10mA DC
  • Dimensions: 2.2" diameter x 5.6" long (50 x 127mm)
  • Weight: 0.75 lbs. (340g)
What's Included:
  • (1) Sound Calibrator
  • (1) Screwdriver
  • (2) 9V batteries
  • (1) Case
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Extech Sound Calibrators 407744 94dB sound calibrator for 0.5" or 1" microphones
$329.99
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Extech Sound Calibrators 407744-NIST 94dB sound calibrator for 0.5" or 1" microphones, NIST traceable
$454.99
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Extech Sound Calibrators 407766 94/114dB sound calibrator for 0.5" or 1" microphones
$419.99
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Extech Sound Calibrators 407766-NIST 94/114dB sound calibrator for 0.5" or 1" microphones, NIST traceable
$544.99
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

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