42280

Extech 42280 Temperature & Humidity Datalogger

Extech 42280 Temperature & Humidity Datalogger

Description

The Extech Temperature & Humidity Datalogger records up to 16,000 readings with USB interface for downloading to a PC.

Features

  • Calibration via optional salt bottles
  • Programmable from keypad or PC
  • Selectable data sampling rate
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$219.99
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

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Details

The Extech Temperature & Humidity Datalogger records up to 16,000 readings with USB interface for downloading to a PC. It includes a triple LCD display that shows temperature, humidity, and the date in year, month, day format. To program the unit, simply use the built-in menu system or connect to a PC with the included Windows software and USB cable. The data sampling rate is selectable from either of these options, as well as programming the audible and visual alarms. The meter can be mounted on a wall, tripod, or even set on a desk.

Notable Specifications:
  • Temperature range: -58 to 1832°F (-50 to 1000°C)
  • Temperature basic accuracy: ±1°/0.6°C
  • Humidity range: 0 to 100%
  • Humidity basic accuracy: ±3%
  • Dew point range: 32 to 122°F (0 to 50°C)
  • Dimensions: 4.75"3.5"x1.5" (120.7x88.9x38.1mm)
  • Weight: 5.7oz (163g)
  • CE: Yes
  • Warranty: 1 year
What's Included:
  • (1) Datalogger
  • (1) Windows compatible software
  • (1) USB cable
  • (1) 110 VAC adapter
  • (4) AA batteries
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Extech 42280 Temperature & Humidity Datalogger 42280 Temperature & humidity datalogger
$219.99
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Extech 42280 Temperature & Humidity Datalogger 42280-NIST Temperature & humidity datalogger, includes NIST certificate
$395.00
Drop ships from manufacturer
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Extech RH300-CAL Calibration Kit RH300-CAL Calibration kit for 445715 & 445815
$59.99
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