CO100

Extech Desktop Indoor Air Quality CO2 Monitor

Extech Desktop Indoor Air Quality CO2 Monitor

Description

The Extech desktop Indoor Air Quality CO2 Monitor measures carbon dioxide, air temperature, and humidity.

Features

  • User programmable visual and audible alarm
  • Maintenance free non-dispersive infrared CO2 sensor
  • Max/min CO2 value recall function
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$269.99
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Details

The Extech Desktop Indoor Air Quality CO2 Monitor checks for carbond dioxide concentrations through the maintenance free NDIR CO2 sensor. Indoor air quality is displayed in ppm with good (0 to 800ppm), normal (800 to 1200ppm), and poor (>1200ppm) indications. A programmable visible and audible CO2 warning alarm will alert users if extreme readings are detected. Measurement ranges are 0 to 9,999ppm for CO2, 14 to 140°F for temperature, and 0.1 to 99.9% for relative humidity.

 

Applications include air quality monitoring in schools, office buildings, greenhouses, factories, hotels, hospitals, transportation lines, and anywhere that high levels of carbon dioxide are generated.

Notable Specifications:
  • CO2 range: 0 to 9,999ppm
  • CO2 resolution: 1ppm
  • Temperature0 range: 14 to 140 °F (-10 to 60 °C)
  • Temp Resolution: 0.1 °F/°C
  • Humidity range: 0.1 to 99.9%
  • Humidity resolution: 0.1%
  • Dimensions: 4.3x4.1x2.4" (110x105x61mm)
  • Weight: 8.1oz (230g)
What's Included:
  • (1) Meter
  • (1) Universal AC adaptor
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Extech Desktop Indoor Air Quality CO2 Monitor CO100 Desktop indoor air quality CO2 monitor
$269.99
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

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