CO200

Extech CO200 Desktop Indoor Air Quality CO2 Monitor

Extech CO200 Desktop Indoor Air Quality CO2 Monitor

Description

The Extech Desktop Indoor Air Quality CO2 Monitor checks for carbon dioxide concentrations.

Features

  • Max/Min CO2 value recall function
  • Visible and Audible CO2 warning alarm with relay output for ventilation control
  • Maintenance free NDIR CO2 sensor
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$269.99
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

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Details

The Extech Desktop Indoor Air Quality CO2 Monitor measures carbon dioxide, air temperature, and humidity. The instrument features a maintenance free non-dispersive infrared CO2 sensor. Indoor air quality is displayed in parts per million with good (380 to 420ppm), normal (<1000ppm), and poor (>1000ppm) indications. The visible and audible alarm with relay output has user-settable high and low alarms. The monitor also displays year, month, date, and time. It is calibrated through the automatic baseline calibration (minimum CO2level over 7.5 days) or manually calibration in fresh air. 

 

Applications include monitoring air quality in schools, office buildings, greenhouses, factories, hotels, hospitals, and anywhere that high levels of carbon dioxide are generated.

Notable Specifications:
  • CO2 Range: 0 to 9,999ppm
  • CO2 resolution: 1ppm
  • Temp range: 14 to 140 °F (-10 to 60 °C)
  • Temp resolution: 0.1 °F/°C
  • Humidity range: 0.1 to 99.9%
  • Humidity resolution: 0.1%
  • Dimensions: 4.6 x 4 x 4" (117 x 102 x 102mm)
  • Weight: 7.2oz (204g)
What's Included:
  • (1) Desktop CO2 Monitor
  • (1) Universal AC adaptor
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Extech CO200 Desktop Indoor Air Quality CO2 Monitor CO200 Desktop indoor air quality CO2 monitor
$269.99
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

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