Extech CO200 Desktop Indoor Air Quality CO2 Monitor

The Extech Desktop Indoor Air Quality CO2 Monitor checks for carbon dioxide concentrations.

Features

  • Max/Min CO2 value recall function
  • Visible and Audible CO2 warning alarm with relay output for ventilation control
  • Maintenance free NDIR CO2 sensor
Your Price $296.99
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Extech
Free Lifetime Tech SupportFree Lifetime Tech Support
Free Ground ShippingFree Ground Shipping
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Extech CO200 Desktop Indoor Air Quality CO2 MonitorCO200 Desktop indoor air quality CO2 monitor
$296.99
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

The Extech Desktop Indoor Air Quality CO2 Monitor measures carbon dioxide, air temperature, and humidity. The instrument features a maintenance free non-dispersive infrared CO2 sensor. Indoor air quality is displayed in parts per million with good (380 to 420ppm), normal (<1000ppm), and poor (>1000ppm) indications. The visible and audible alarm with relay output has user-settable high and low alarms. The monitor also displays year, month, date, and time. It is calibrated through the automatic baseline calibration (minimum CO2level over 7.5 days) or manually calibration in fresh air. 

 

Applications include monitoring air quality in schools, office buildings, greenhouses, factories, hotels, hospitals, and anywhere that high levels of carbon dioxide are generated.

  • CO2 Range: 0 to 9,999ppm
  • CO2 resolution: 1ppm
  • Temp range: 14 to 140 °F (-10 to 60 °C)
  • Temp resolution: 0.1 °F/°C
  • Humidity range: 0.1 to 99.9%
  • Humidity resolution: 0.1%
  • Dimensions: 4.6 x 4 x 4" (117 x 102 x 102mm)
  • Weight: 7.2oz (204g)
  • (1) Desktop CO2 Monitor
  • (1) Universal AC adaptor
Questions & Answers
No Questions
Please, mind that only logged in users can submit questions

In The News

Flux towers track CO2 exchange between forests and atmosphere

Determining exchange rates of carbon dioxide between the earth’s forests and the atmosphere is turbulent business. Wind above forest canopies swirls as vortexes of air enter and exit stands of trees.  Across the globe, towers stand among the landscape, with sensors monitoring these eddies for carbon dioxide, water vapor and other gasses.  These so-called “flux towers” collect data on carbon dioxide exchange rates between the earth and atmosphere. Information gathered plays into the debate on the measurable effects of climate change. Carbon dioxide flows between the earth, atmosphere and ocean in an attempt to reach equilibrium. As automobiles and energy production facilities burn fossil fuels, more carbon dioxide joins to the mix.

Read More

Monitoring for Runup Signals to Reduce Sneaker Wave Risk

Around the world, the occasional phenomenon known as sneaker waves poses a threat to beachgoers. Unusually large sneaker waves in 2016 and 2018 prompted Oregon State University (OSU) researchers to investigate these mysterious events. The research revealed the presence of runup signals that can provide earlier warnings to officials, reducing risk from these dangerous events. Dr. Tuba Ozkan-Haller of OSU spoke to EM about the research . “Sneaker waves occur in the Pacific Northwest, but they're also a worldwide phenomenon,” explains Dr. Ozkan-Haller. “Certain kinds of coastlines appear to be more well-suited to the occurrence of these waves. There are some characteristics that we know play into it, but there's still a lot of unknowns too.

Read More

Utah’s Canyonlands Research Center: A Great Study Location for Climate Effects on Ecosystem Processes, Community Dynamics and More

Canyonlands Research Center (CRC) is situated at The Nature Conservancy’s Dugout Ranch , over 5,200 private acres of research study area. One of CRC’s primary roles is to facilitate research and monitoring work of university and federal researchers. CRC is located adjacent to Canyonlands National Park , which extends over more than 337,000 acres of public land. CRC also partners with many organizations, including the Bureau of Land Management, USFS, NPS, USGS, Utah State University, and the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources to identify the most pressing research needs in this region.

Read More