Extech CO250 Portable Indoor Air Quality CO2 Meter

The Extech Portable Indoor Air Quality CO2 Meter measures carbon dioxide, temperature, humidity, dew point, and wet bulb.

Features

  • User programmable audible alarm
  • Built-in RS-232 interface for capturing readings on PC
  • Maintenance free non-dispersive infrared CO2 sensor
Your Price $409.99
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
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Extech CO250 Portable Indoor Air Quality CO2 MeterCO250 Portable indoor air quality CO2 meter
$409.99
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Extech CO250 Portable Indoor Air Quality CO2 Meter
CO250
Portable indoor air quality CO2 meter
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
$409.99

The Extech Portable Indoor Air Quality CO2 Meter checks for carbon dioxide concentrations and calculates statistical 8 hour and 15 minute time weighted averages. The maintenance free NDIR sensor has measurement ranges from 0 to 5,000ppm for CO2, 14 to 140°F for temperature, and 0.0 to 99.9% for humidity.Programable audible alarms will alert users if readings detect a high concentration of CO2. 

 

The built-in RS-232 interface captures readings to transfer to a PC. The data acquisition software and included cable record and document CO2, humidity, and temperature data. Applications include checking air quality in schools, office buildings, greenhouses, hospitals, and anywhere that high carbon levels of carbon dioxide are generated.

  • CO2 range: 0 to 5,000ppm
  • CO2 resolution: 1ppm
  • Temperature range: 14 to 140 °F (-10 to 60 °C)
  • Temperature resolution: 0.1 °F/°C
  • Humidity range: 0.0 to 99.9%
  • Humidity resolution: 0.1%
  • Wet bulb & dew point: calculated
  • Dimensions: 7.9 x 2.7 x 2.3 (200 x 70 x 57mm)
  • Weight: 6.7 oz. (190g)
  • (1) Meter
  • (1) Software and cable
  • (4) AA batteries
  • (1) Carrying case
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