CO50

Extech Desktop Carbon Monoxide Monitor

Extech Desktop Carbon Monoxide Monitor

Description

The Extech Desktop Carbon Monoxide Monitor measures carbon monoxide concentration, air temperature, and humidity with user-settable carbon monoxide audible alarm.

Features

  • Visibly Bright LED Indicates Active Monitoring (Green) Or Surpassed CO Alarm Threshold (Red)
  • Record/Recall Max Reading For Carbon Monoxide Concentration
  • Carbon Monoxide Calibration Function In Fresh Air
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$249.99
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Why Buy From Fondriest?

Details

The CO50’s extra loud beeping alarm (>85dB at 3 meters) provides an excellent way to monitor indoor air quality in large spaces.

Common CO Problem Areas: 

  • Gas stoves/ranges or clothes dryers used to heat homes
  • Out-of-adjustment burners
  • Blocked chimneys
  • Gas or kerosene space heaters 
  • Idling vehicles in garages 
  • Charcoal grills used indoors
  • Gas-powered generators or small-engine equipment such as weed wackers, leaf blowers, lawn mowers operated in enclosed areas 
  • Furnaces and water heaters with inadequate ventilation

Features:

  • Designed with Electrochemical CO sensor
  • Internal memory for manually storing up to 99 readings with recall function
Notable Specifications:
  • Carbon Monoxide: 0 to 999ppm
  • Temperature (Air): 14 to 140°F (-10 to 60°C)
  • Relative Humidity: 10 to 90%RH
  • Dimensions: 6.1 x 3.4 x 3.2"
What's Included:

(1) Desktop Monitor

(1) Universal AC Adapter, 100V- 240V

(1) Multiple Plug Types (US, EU, UK, AUS)

Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Extech Desktop Carbon Monoxide Monitor CO50 Desktop Carbon Monoxide Monitor
$249.99
Drop ships from manufacturer

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