DL160

Extech DL160 Dual Input AC Voltage/Current Datalogger

Extech DL160 Dual Input AC Voltage/Current Datalogger

Description

The Extech Input AC Voltage/Current Datalogger simultaneoulsy measures two AC voltage inputs or two AC current inputs.

Features

  • Datalogs up to 256,000 readings
  • LCD indicates time/date, current readings and min/max
  • Readings can be downloaded to PC via the USB interface
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$309.99
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Details

The Extech Dual Input True RMS AC Voltage/Current Datalogger simultaneously measures two AC voltage inputs or two AC current inputs, or one AC voltage and one AC current input. The instrument datalogs up to 256,000 readings with user programmable sampling rates from 1 second to 24 hours. Readings can be downloaded to a PC via the USB interface and analyzed using the included software or exported to a spreadsheet. The LCD screen indicates time/date, current readings, and max/min data points.

Notable Specifications:
  • AC current range: 10 to 200A
  • AC current resolution: 0.1A
  • AC current basic accuracy: ±(2% rdg ± 1A)
  • AC voltage range: 10 to 600V
  • AC voltage resolution: 0.1V
  • AC voltage basic accuracy: ±(2% rdg ± 1V)
  • Memory: 256,000 points
  • Sampling rate: 1 second to 24 hours
  • PC interface: USB includes software
  • Power: 4 x AAA batteries
  • Dimensions: 4.5 x 2.5 x 1.3" (114 x 63 x 34mm) 
  • Weight: 8.7oz (248g)
What's Included:
  • (1) Datalogger
  • (4) AAA batteries
  • (2) Memory 2032 button batteries
  • (1) Universal AC adapter
  • (2) Current sensor modules
  • (2) Voltage sensor modules
  • (2) Sets of test leads
  • (2) Sets of alligator clips
  • (1) USB cable
  • (1) Softare CD-ROM, for use with Windows OS
  • (1) Carrying case
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Extech DL160 Dual Input AC Voltage/Current Datalogger DL160 Dual input true RMS AC voltage/current datalogger
$309.99
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

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