Extech ExStik Replacement Dissolved Oxygen Electrode

The Extech ExStick Replacement Dissolved Oxygen Electrode is for use with ExStick dissolved oxygen meters.

Features

  • Screw-on membrane cap for easy replacement
  • ATC via built-in Pt-100Ohm sensor
  • Use electrochemical polarographic technology
Your Price $159.99
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Extech
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Extech ExStik Replacement Dissolved Oxygen ElectrodeDO605 ExStik replacement dissolved oxygen electrode for ExStick dissolved oxygen meter
$159.99
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Extech ExStik Replacement Dissolved Oxygen Electrode
DO605
ExStik replacement dissolved oxygen electrode for ExStick dissolved oxygen meter
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
$159.99
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Extech ExStik II Dissolved Oxygen Meter DO600 ExStik II dissolved oxygen meter
$259.99
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
ExStik II dissolved oxygen meter
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
$259.99

The Extech ExStick Replacement Dissolved Oxygen Electrode measures dissolved oxygen and temperature. It is compatible with the Extech ExStick Dissolved Oxygen Meter. The module is non-interchangeable with ExStik pH, Chlorine or ORP Meter.

  • (1) Replacement Electrode
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