Extech EzFlex Combustible Gas Detector

The Extech EzFlex Combustible Gas Detector quickly identifies and pinpoints gas leaks.

Features

  • High Sensitivity
  • 16” (406mm) flexible gooseneck
  • Easy, one hand operation with thumb-controlled sensitivity adjustment
Your Price $146.99
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The Extech EzFlex Combustible Gas Detector features a 16 inch flexible gooseneck for easy access into hard to reach locations. The detector quickly identifies and pinpoints the smalles gas leaks. The detector's high sensitivity will alert users through a visible and audible alarm at 10% lower explosive limit for methane. The one hand operation with thumb controlled sensitivity adjustement eliminates background gas levels.

 

Gas detected include:

 

  • Natural gas
  • Methane
  • Ethane
  • Propane
  • Butane
  • Acetone
  • Alcohol
  • Ammonia
  • Steam
  • Carbon monoxide
  • Gasoline
  • Jet fuel
  • Hydrogen sulfide
  • Smoke
  • Industrial solvents
  • Lacquer thinner
  • Naphtha
  • Pump driven field calibration range: 10ppm
  • Sensor type: solid state
  • Alarm: visible & audible @ 10% LEL for Methane
  • Warm-up: Approx. 1 minute
  • Response time:< 2 seconds (up to 40% LEL)
  • Duty cycle: intermittent
  • Battery life: 8 hours continuous use typical
  • Dimensions: 8.7"x2.83"x1.8" (221x72x46mm)
  • Weight: 18.4oz (520g)
  • Warranty: 1 year
  • (1) Portable gas detector
  • (3) C batteries
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Extech EzFlex Combustible Gas Detector
EZ40
EzFlex combustible gas detector
$146.99
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