HD400

Extech Heavy Duty Light Meter

Extech Heavy Duty Light Meter

Description

The Extech Heavy Duty Light Meter utilizes precision silicon photo diode and spectral response filter for accurate light level readings.

Features

  • Manually store/recall up to 99 readings
  • Cosine and color corrected measurements
  • Peak mode (10mS) captures highest reading
Free Shipping on this product
Your Price
$219.99
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

Shipping Information
Return Policy
Why Buy From Fondriest?

Details

The Extech Heavy Duty Light Meter manually stores and recalls up to 99 light level readings. Model HD450 datalogger model automatically stores up to 16,000 readings. The meter has a wide range to 40,000Fc or 400,000 Lux. It utilizes precision silicon diode and spectral response filter, and performs cosine and color corrected measurements. The peak mode (10mS) captures the highest readings, and the relative mode indicates changes in light levels. The meter has a built-in USB port for connecting to a PC for further analysis using the included software. 

Notable Specifications:
  • Display counts: 4,000 count backlit LCD
  • Fc range: 40, 400, 4,000, 40,000Fc
  • Lux range: 400, 4,000, 40,000Lux
  • Maximum resolution: 0.01Fc/0.1Lux
  • Basic accuracy: +/-5%
  • Cosine & color corrected: Yes
  • PC interface: USB
  • Dimensions: 6.7"x3.1"x1.6 (170x80x40mm)
  • Weight: 13.7oz (390g)
  • CE: Yes
  • Warranty: 1 year
What's Included:
  • (1) Light meter
  • (1) Light sensor
  • (1) Protective cover with 39" (1m) cable
  • (1) Windows 95/98/NT/2000/ME/XP compatible software
  • (1) USB cable
  • (1) Built-in stand
  • (1) Hard-sided carrying case
  • (1) 9 V battery
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Extech Heavy Duty Light Meter HD400 Heavy duty light meter
$219.99
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Extech Heavy Duty Light Meter HD400-NIST Heavy duty light meter, NIST traceable
$344.99
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Extech Heavy Duty Data Logging Light Meter HD450 Heavy duty datalogging light meter
$269.99
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Extech Heavy Duty Data Logging Light Meter HD450-NIST Heavy duty datalogging light meter, NIST traceable
$394.99
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

In The News

Sustainable, Sponge-like Material Takes the Color Out of Dyes

Dyes are part of manufacturing everything from clothing to food all over the world. In fact, every year about 700,000 metric tons of dye change the hue of consumer goods. However, about ten percent of that dye ends up in the world's waterways, sometimes with toxic results. Even non-toxic dyes pose a threat in the environment, because changing the color of the water in streams, lakes, holding ponds, and rivers can mean interfering with plants' ability to photosynthesize. This, in turn, disrupts the rest of the local ecosystem.

Read More

Underwater Robots to Monitor the Great Barrier Reef

The Great Barrier Reef (GBR) is composed of over 3,000 individual reefs, making it the most massive reef system on Earth. Its 900-plus islands cover more than 344,400 square kilometers, about half the size of Texas. That's a lot of ground to cover if you're a scientist or research team studying the reef; add in the difficulties inherent to conducting research underwater, including anything from sharks to bad weather, and you have a serious challenge on your hands. Now, a research team from the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) is trialing an underwater robot with a hyperspectral camera that works in tandem with aerial drones, testing their ability to monitor the GBR.

Read More

Healthy Lakes Have Real, Calculable Value for Humans

Do you have a childhood memory of a favorite lake you used to visit with family and friends? This is one of the most common experiences we share as Americans, and how much we care about lake ecosystems can affect how much protection we afford them. Recent research from Virginia Tech , University of Wisconsin , The Pennsylvania State University , Cornell University , Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies , and Michigan State University models both human and natural systems to explore how humans and the environment affect each other. An unusual approach This collaboration began more than three years ago when an economist and a limnologist on the team happened to meet each other while traveling.

Read More