Extech MO750 Soil Moisture Meter

The Extech Soil Moisture Meter features an 8 inch stainless steel moisture probe.

Features

  • Soil moisture content measurement from 0 to 50%
  • Min/max records minimum and maximum moisture readings
  • Data hold to freeze reading on display
Your Price $289.99
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
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Extech MO750 Soil Moisture MeterMO750 Soil moisture meter
$289.99
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Extech MO750 Soil Moisture Meter
MO750
Soil moisture meter
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
$289.99

The Extech Soil Moisture Probe performs moisture content measurements from 0 to 50%. With easy one-hand operation, the meter records minimum and maximum moisture readings. The data hold function freezes the readings on the display for further analysis.

  • Sensor type: integrated contact probe
  • Moisture content: 0 to 50%
  • Maximum resolution: 0.1%
  • Dimensions: 14.7 x 1.6 x 1.6 (374 x 40 x 40mm)
  • Weight: 9.4oz (267g)
  • (1) Meter
  • (1) Sensor cap
  • (4) AAA batteries
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