PH4-P

Extech pH 4 Buffer Solution

Extech pH 4 Buffer Solution

Description

The Extech pH 4 Buffer Solution includes 2 convenient pint size conductivity standards to calibrate conductivity meters to optimize accuracy.

Features

  • Easy to use, already made fresh pH buffers for calibration
  • Helpful table shows what the pH value should be vs. the temperature of the buffer solution
  • Ensures measurement accuracy
Your Price
$23.99
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

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Details

The Extech pH 4 Buffer Solution is for calibrating pH and conductivity meters to ensure measurement accuracy. The easy to use, already made fresh pH buffers include a helpful table that shows what the pH value should be and what the temperature of the buffer solution measured. The rinsing solution is used for cleaning off the pH electrodes after taking the next measurement from a different solution to prevent contamination. 

What's Included:
  • (2) One pint bottles of pH 4 buffer
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Extech pH 4 Buffer Solution PH4-P pH 4 buffer solution, 2 pint bottles
$23.99
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Additional Product Information:

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