Extech CO2/ Humidity/ Temperature Datalogger

The Extech Humidity/ Temperature Datalogger simultaneously displays CO2, temperature, and relative humidity.

Features

  • Selectable data sampling rate: 5, 10, 30, 60, 120, 300, 600 seconds or auto
  • Maintenance free dual wavelength NDIR CO2 sensor
  • Records data on an SD card in Excel ® format
Your Price $449.99
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Extech CO2/ Humidity/ Temperature DataloggerSD800 Carbon dioxide/ humidity/ temperature datalogger
$449.99
Check Availability  
Extech CO2/ Humidity/ Temperature Datalogger
SD800
Carbon dioxide/ humidity/ temperature datalogger
Check Availability  
$449.99

The Extech CO2/Humidity/Temperature Datalogger features a maintenance free dual wavelength non-dispersive infrared CO2 sensor that checks for carbon dioxide concentrations. The triple LCD simultaneously displays CO2, temperature, and relative humidity. The datalogger date/time stamps and stores readings on an SD card for easy transfer to a PC. Selectable data sampling rate range from 5, 10, 30, 60, 120, 300, and 600 seconds or auto. 

 

Applications include monitoring air quality in schools, office buildings, greenhouses, hospitals, or anywhere that high levels of carbon dioxide are generated.

  • CO2 range: 0 to 4,000ppm
  • CO2 accuracy: ±40ppm (<1000ppm); ±5% rdg (>1000ppm)
  • CO2 resolution: 1ppm
  • Temperature: 32 to 122°F (0 to 50°C)
  • Temperature accuracy: ±1.8°F/0.8°C
  • Temperature resolution: 0.1°F/°C
  • Humidity range: 10 to 90%
  • Humidity accuracy: ±4%RH
  • Humidity resolution: 0.1%
  • Datalogging: 20M data using 2G SD memory card
  • Dimensions: 5.2 x 3.1 x 1.3" (132 x 80 x 32mm)
  • Weight: 9.9oz(282g)
  • (1) Datalogger
  • (6) AAA batteries
  • (1) 2G SD card
  • (1) Universal AC adaptor
  • (1) Mounting bracket
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