Extech TH10 Temperature USB Datalogger

The Extech Temperature USB Datalogger features a status indication red/yellow LED and green LED.

Features

  • Datalogs up to 32,000 temperature readings
  • Selectable data sampling rate: 2s, 5s, 10s, 30s, 1m, 5m, 10m, 30m, 1hr, 2hr, 3hr, 6hr, 12hr, 24hr
  • User-programmable alarm thresholds
Your Price $65.99
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Extech TH10 Temperature USB DataloggerTH10 Temperature USB datalogger
$65.99
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

The Extech Temperature USB Datalogger records up to 32,000 readings datalogs temperature readings with user programmable sample rates of 2s, 5s, 10s, 30s, 1m, 5m, 10m,30m, 1hr, 2hr, 3hr, 6hr, 12hr, or 24hr. 

  • Temperature range: -40 to 158°F (-40 to 70°C)
  • Temperature resolution: 0.1°F/°C 
  • Temperature basic accuracy: ±1.8°F (14 to 104°F), ±3.6°F (all other ranges), ±1.0°C (-10 to 40°C), ±2.0°C (all other ranges)
  • Datalogging interval: 2 seconds to 24 hours
  • Memory: 32,000 points
  • Dimensions: 5.1 x 1.1 x 0.9" (130 x 30 x 25mm)
  • Weight: 1oz (20g)
  • (1) Temperature data logger
  • (1) Mounting bracket
  • (1) Protective USB cap
  • (1) Windows compatible software
  • (1) 3.6 V battery
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