FNCS9945-P

Fondriest Environmental 45,000 uS Conductivity Standards

Fondriest Environmental 45,000 uS Conductivity Standards

Description

45,000 uS conductivity standard, 1 pint

Features

  • +/-1% accuracy with NIST traceability
  • Pre-mixed and ready to use
Your Price
$26.67
Usually ships in 3-5 days

Shipping Information
Return Policy
Why Buy From Fondriest?
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Fondriest Environmental 45,000 uS Conductivity Standards FNCS9945-P Conductivity standard, 45,000 uS, 500mL bottle
$26.67
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Fondriest Environmental 45,000 uS Conductivity Standards FNCS9945-Q Conductivity standard, 45,000 uS, 1L bottle
$29.60
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Fondriest Environmental 45,000 uS Conductivity Standards FNCS9945-G Conductivity standard, 45,000 uS, 4L bottle
$48.65
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Fondriest Environmental 45,000 uS Conductivity Standards FNCS9945-F Conductivity standard, 45,000 uS, 4L cubitainer
$57.54
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Fondriest Environmental 45,000 uS Conductivity Standards FNCS9945-10L Conductivity standard, 45,000 uS, 10L cubitainer
$114.18
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Fondriest Environmental 45,000 uS Conductivity Standards FNCS9945-T Conductivity standard, 45,000 uS, 20L cubitainer
$196.44
Usually ships in 3-5 days

In The News

What is Conductivity?

UPDATE : Fondriest Environmental is offering their expertise in conductivity through their new online knowledge base. This resource provides an updated and comprehensive look at conductivity and why it is important to water quality. To learn more, check out: Conductivity, Salinity and TDS . Salinity and conductivity  measure the water's ability to conduct electricity, which provides a measure of what is dissolved in water. In the SWMP data, a higher conductivity value indicates that there are more chemicals dissolved in the water. Conductivity measures the water's ability to conduct electricity. It is the opposite of resistance. Pure, distilled water is a poor conductor of electricity.

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Acid Rain Data Helping Scientists Tackle Water Quality Issues

Since the 1980s, scientists from the Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation (VT DEC) have been sampling water from acid-impaired ponds and lakes and tracking data related to acidity. The line of inquiry began in response to concerns about acid rain, but DEC scientists now find that the long-term monitoring is not only proving the efficacy of the Clean Air Act but also improving local water quality. Guarding the environment in Vermont Rebecca Harvey is a VT DEC scientist, and monitoring the state's waterways for acidity and other problems falls in part to her. Dr. Harvey corresponded with EM about this work.

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Advanced Oxidation Processes for Wastewater Treatment

In the ongoing quest for better wastewater treatment, a team of researchers from the University of California, Riverside (UCR) have developed a technique to improve the way Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs) remove pollutants from wastewater dramatically. AOPs remove organic materials from water using oxidation. These AOP reactions take place when hydrogen peroxide, a powerful oxidizing agent, decomposes, leaving hydroxyl radicals along with oxygen and water behind. This makes the processes appealing, but until now they've required both a long period of time and large amounts of both hydrogen peroxide and ferrous salt (Fe2+, a divalent iron ion). The Fe2+ acts like a catalyst, but also produces a secondary pollutant in the form of an iron-containing sludge.

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