Geneq SXBlue GNSS Receiver

The SXBlue is a compact GPS/GNSS and SBAS module that offers sub-meter performance suitable for a variety of applications.

Features

  • Bluetooth and an RS-232 serial ports with NMEA 0183 or RTCM-104 capability
  • Low power consumption and optional 2, 10 or 20Hz position update rates
  • If recently powered SXBlue will provide a position within approximately 35 seconds
Your Price $2,595.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Geneq
Government and Educational PricingGovernment and Educational Pricing
Free Lifetime Tech SupportFree Lifetime Tech Support
Free Ground ShippingFree Ground Shipping
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Geneq SXBlue GNSS ReceiverGESXB1GNSS12VK SXBlue GNSS receiver bundle, 12VDC
$2,595.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Geneq SXBlue GNSS Receiver GESXB1GNSS24VK SXBlue GNSS receiver bundle, 24VDC
$2,595.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Geneq SXBlue GNSS Receiver
GESXB1GNSS12VK
SXBlue GNSS receiver bundle, 12VDC
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$2,595.00
Geneq SXBlue GNSS Receiver
GESXB1GNSS24VK
SXBlue GNSS receiver bundle, 24VDC
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$2,595.00
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Geneq SXBlue II 10Hz Data Output Upgrade GESX210HZ- SXBlue II 10Hz data output upgrade
$495.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Geneq SXBlue II 20Hz Data Output Upgrade GESX220HZ- SXBlue II 20Hz data output upgrade
$695.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Geneq SXBlue II 10Hz Data Output Upgrade
GESX210HZ-
SXBlue II 10Hz data output upgrade
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$495.00
Geneq SXBlue II 20Hz Data Output Upgrade
GESX220HZ-
SXBlue II 20Hz data output upgrade
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$695.00

GPS, GNSS and SBAS
The SXBlue is a compact GPS/GNSS and SBAS module that offers sub-meter performance suitable for a variety of applications including Forestry, Mining, Machine Navigation, Precision Agriculture, GIS and Mapping, at a price that you can afford.

Bluetooth Enabled
The SXBlue provides a wireless link with any Bluetooth enabled PDA, computer or device, thus eliminating the need for cumbersome cabling.

High Performance GPS
The SXBlue delivers sub-meter positioning accuracy, low power consumption and optional 2, 10 or 20Hz position update rates. It uses a new GPS/GNSS engine architecture that provides faster startup and acquisition times. With a current almanac and ephemeris, the SXBlue GNSS will provide a position within 35 seconds. If it’s been powered within the last couple hours, the SXBlue GNSS will provide a position within approximately 20 seconds.

SBAS Support
The US Federal Aviation Administration’s Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) is now undergoing rigorous final testing for its Initial Operation Capability. Other WAAS-compatible Space Based Augmentation Systems (SBAS) are also under development elsewhere such as the European Geostationary Navigation Overlay System (EGNOS) and the Japanese MTSAT Satellite-based Augmentation System (MSAS), among others. The SXBlue provides compatibility for each of these free
services.

Interface
The SXBlue features a Bluetooth and an RS-232 serial ports, both of which may be independently configured for versatility. For example, both ports might be set to output either NMEA 183 or RTCM-104. The RS-232 can be configured to consume RTCM 104 data. A series of LED on the front panel provides useful monitoring information such as Power, GPS/GNSS, DGPS, SBAS Lock and Bluetooth connection.

COAST Technology
Coast Technology allows the SXBlue to use aged correction data for up to 45 minutes or more without seriously affecting the quality of your positioning. Using Coast, the SXBlue is less likely to be affected by differential outages due to differential signal blockages, weak signal, or interference. No other product offers this flexibility.

  • (1) Geneq SXBlue GNSS Receiver
  • (1) Precision Antenna
  • (1) Cable Antenna, 3m
  • (1) Cable (Straight) Fused Power, 3m
  • (1) RS-232 Cable, 3m
  • (1) Mounting Brackets
  • (1) CD-ROM SXBlue Series
Questions & Answers
No Questions
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