Geneq SXBlue GNSS Receiver

The SXBlue is a compact GPS/GNSS and SBAS module that offers sub-meter performance suitable for a variety of applications.

Features

  • Bluetooth and an RS-232 serial ports with NMEA 0183 or RTCM-104 capability
  • Low power consumption and optional 2, 10 or 20Hz position update rates
  • If recently powered SXBlue will provide a position within approximately 35 seconds
Your Price $2,595.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Geneq
Government and Educational PricingGovernment and Educational Pricing
Free Lifetime Tech SupportFree Lifetime Tech Support
Free Ground ShippingFree Ground Shipping
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Geneq SXBlue GNSS ReceiverGESXB1GNSS12VK SXBlue GNSS receiver bundle, 12VDC
$2,595.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Geneq SXBlue GNSS Receiver GESXB1GNSS24VK SXBlue GNSS receiver bundle, 24VDC
$2,595.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Geneq SXBlue GNSS Receiver
GESXB1GNSS12VK
SXBlue GNSS receiver bundle, 12VDC
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$2,595.00
Geneq SXBlue GNSS Receiver
GESXB1GNSS24VK
SXBlue GNSS receiver bundle, 24VDC
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$2,595.00
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Geneq SXBlue II 10Hz Data Output Upgrade GESX210HZ- SXBlue II 10Hz data output upgrade
$495.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Geneq SXBlue II 20Hz Data Output Upgrade GESX220HZ- SXBlue II 20Hz data output upgrade
$695.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Geneq SXBlue II 10Hz Data Output Upgrade
GESX210HZ-
SXBlue II 10Hz data output upgrade
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$495.00
Geneq SXBlue II 20Hz Data Output Upgrade
GESX220HZ-
SXBlue II 20Hz data output upgrade
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$695.00

GPS, GNSS and SBAS
The SXBlue is a compact GPS/GNSS and SBAS module that offers sub-meter performance suitable for a variety of applications including Forestry, Mining, Machine Navigation, Precision Agriculture, GIS and Mapping, at a price that you can afford.

Bluetooth Enabled
The SXBlue provides a wireless link with any Bluetooth enabled PDA, computer or device, thus eliminating the need for cumbersome cabling.

High Performance GPS
The SXBlue delivers sub-meter positioning accuracy, low power consumption and optional 2, 10 or 20Hz position update rates. It uses a new GPS/GNSS engine architecture that provides faster startup and acquisition times. With a current almanac and ephemeris, the SXBlue GNSS will provide a position within 35 seconds. If it’s been powered within the last couple hours, the SXBlue GNSS will provide a position within approximately 20 seconds.

SBAS Support
The US Federal Aviation Administration’s Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) is now undergoing rigorous final testing for its Initial Operation Capability. Other WAAS-compatible Space Based Augmentation Systems (SBAS) are also under development elsewhere such as the European Geostationary Navigation Overlay System (EGNOS) and the Japanese MTSAT Satellite-based Augmentation System (MSAS), among others. The SXBlue provides compatibility for each of these free
services.

Interface
The SXBlue features a Bluetooth and an RS-232 serial ports, both of which may be independently configured for versatility. For example, both ports might be set to output either NMEA 183 or RTCM-104. The RS-232 can be configured to consume RTCM 104 data. A series of LED on the front panel provides useful monitoring information such as Power, GPS/GNSS, DGPS, SBAS Lock and Bluetooth connection.

COAST Technology
Coast Technology allows the SXBlue to use aged correction data for up to 45 minutes or more without seriously affecting the quality of your positioning. Using Coast, the SXBlue is less likely to be affected by differential outages due to differential signal blockages, weak signal, or interference. No other product offers this flexibility.

  • (1) Geneq SXBlue GNSS Receiver
  • (1) Precision Antenna
  • (1) Cable Antenna, 3m
  • (1) Cable (Straight) Fused Power, 3m
  • (1) RS-232 Cable, 3m
  • (1) Mounting Brackets
  • (1) CD-ROM SXBlue Series
Questions & Answers
No Questions
Please, mind that only logged in users can submit questions

In The News

Tides and microbes transform nitrogen where streams and the ocean meet

Enormous amounts of excess nitrogen hit water bodies all over the globe, including the U.S., due to runoff from agricultural and other human activities. This nitrogen can cause dead zones and harmful algal growth. Before it reaches the ocean, microbes can process and remove some of it from stream sediments, connected aquifers and tidal freshwater zones.  Thanks to this process, coasts can have a decreased likelihood of harmful algal blooms.  Keeping coastal waters clean is important for many reasons, including the fact that about 60% of the U.S. population lives on coasts. But despite the importance of these nitrogen processes, researchers have not fully investigated how they work.

Read More

Climate, nutrients and the future of hypoxia in a Chesapeake Bay tributary

The Chesapeake Bay is the site of recurring seasonal dead zones: areas of low dissolved oxygen where aquatic life struggles to survive if it can at all. In 2020, a dead zone in the Maryland portion of the bay was one of the smallest since 1985, when record keeping began. The hypoxic area in the Virginia portion of the bay was smaller and briefer than many years previous. But the problem isn’t gone yet, and looking forward, climate change will play a big role in determining the size and severity of dead zones throughout the bay. It could make it harder to get hypoxia under control in some places.

Read More

Fecal bacteria rises with sea level on Texas beaches

As climate change lifts the sea level in the Gulf of Mexico, it’s lifting levels of enterococci bacteria on Texas’s beaches, too. New research out of the Gulf shows that high levels of enterococci bacteria, which come from humans and other animals and can cause disease, are correlated with proximity to large human populations and sea level rise and are increasing over time. The research highlights an area of growing concern for public health and safety on popular recreational beaches. While sea level is projected to continue rising, it’s not a guarantee that bacteria levels will as well.

Read More