Geneq SXBlue GPS Receiver

The Geneq SXBlue GPS Receiver is a compact GPS and SBAS module that offers sub-meter performance.

Features

  • Bluetooth and an RS-232 serial ports with NMEA 0183 or RTCM-104 capability
  • Low power consumption and optional 2, 10 or 20Hz position update rates
  • If recently powered SXBlue will provide a position within approximately 20 seconds
Your Price $1,795.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Geneq
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Geneq SXBlue GPS ReceiverGESXB112VKIT SXBlue GPS receiver bundle, 12VDC
$1,795.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Geneq SXBlue GPS Receiver GESXB124VKIT SXBlue GPS receiver bundle, 24VDC
$1,795.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Geneq SXBlue II 10Hz Data Output Upgrade GESX210HZ- SXBlue II 10Hz data output upgrade
$495.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Geneq SXBlue II 20Hz Data Output Upgrade GESX220HZ- SXBlue II 20Hz data output upgrade
$695.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days

High Performance GPS
The Geneq SXBlue GPS Receiver delivers sub-meter positioning accuracy, low power consumption and optional 2, 10 or 20Hz position update rates. It uses a new GPS engine architecture that provides faster startup and acquisition times. With a current almanac and ephemeris, the SXBlue will provide a position within 35 seconds. If its been powered within the last couple hours, the SXBlue will provide a position within approximately 20 seconds.

GPS and SBAS
The SXBlue is a compact GPS and SBAS module that offers sub-meter performance suitable for a variety of applications including Forestry, Mining, Machine Navigation, Precision Agriculture, GIS and Mapping, at a price that you can afford.

SBAS Support
The US Federal Aviation Administrations Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) is now undergoing rigorous final testing for its Initial Operation Capability. Other WAAS-compatible Space Based Augmentation Systems (SBAS) are also under development elsewhere such as the European Geostationary Navigation Overlay System (EGNOS) and the Japanese MTSAT Satellite-based Augmentation System (MSAS), among others. The SXBlue provides compatibility for each of these free services.

Interface
The SXBlue features a Bluetooth and an RS-232 serial ports, both of which may be independently configured for versatility. For example, both ports might be set to output either NMEA 0183 or RTCM-104. The RS-232 might be configured for RTCM-104 input. A series of LED on the front panel provides useful monitoring information such as Power, GPS, DGPS, SBAS Lock and Bluetooth connection.

  • (1) Geneq SXBlue GPS Receiver
  • (1) Precision Antenna
  • (1) Cable Antenna, 3m
  • (1) Cable (Straight) Fused Power, 3m
  • (1) RS-232 Cable, 3m
  • (1) Mounting Brackets
  • (1) CD-ROM SXBlue Series
Questions & Answers
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