Geotech ET Portable Water Level Meters

The Geotech ET Portable Water Level Meters are designed to provide reliable and accurate measurements of groundwater levels.

Features

  • Highly accurate Polyethylene coated steel well tape marked in engineering or metric increments
  • Field serviceable 5/8" probe or optional 3/8" non-field replaceable probe
  • Adjustable sensitivity to prevent false triggering
Your Price $575.00
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Geotech ET Portable Water Level Meters82050012 ET portable well tape with field replaceable 5/8" probe & English increments, 100'
$575.00
Drop ships from manufacturer
Geotech ET Portable Water Level Meters 82050074 ET portable well tape with 3/8" probe & English increments, 100'
$585.00
Drop ships from manufacturer
Geotech ET Portable Water Level Meters 82050013 ET portable well tape with field replaceable 5/8" probe & English increments, 200'
$702.00
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Geotech ET Portable Water Level Meters 82050075 ET portable well tape with 3/8" probe & English increments, 200'
$713.00
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Geotech ET Portable Water Level Meters 82050014 ET portable well tape with field replaceable 5/8" probe & English increments, 300'
$852.00
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Geotech ET Portable Water Level Meters 82050076 ET portable well tape with 3/8" probe & English increments, 300'
$864.00
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Geotech ET Water Level Meter Carrying Bag 12050059 ET water level meter carrying bag
$78.00
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Geotech ET/ETL Replacement Probe 52050052 ET/ETL replacement probe, 5/8"
$60.00
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The Geotech ET Water Level Meter is a portable instrument used to accurately measure water levels in monitoring wells. The well tape is mounted on an extremely durable polypropylene storage reel with rugged aluminum frame. The polyethylene-coated engineer's tape is accurate to 1/100th of a foot.

The sensor consists of a stainless steel and FEP probe, and it relies on fluid conductivity to determine the presence of water. When the instrument contacts water, an audible signal and visible green light activate. The well tape also features adjustable sensitivity, which is used to prevent false triggering.
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