Geotech ET Portable Water Level Meters

The Geotech ET Portable Water Level Meters are designed to provide reliable and accurate measurements of groundwater levels.

Features

  • Highly accurate Polyethylene coated steel well tape marked in engineering or metric increments
  • Field serviceable 5/8" probe or optional 3/8" non-field replaceable probe
  • Adjustable sensitivity to prevent false triggering
Your Price $575.00
Drop ships from manufacturer
Geotech
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Geotech ET Portable Water Level Meters82050012 ET portable well tape with field replaceable 5/8" probe & imperial increments, 100'
$575.00
Drop ships from manufacturer
Geotech ET Portable Water Level Meters 82050074 ET portable well tape with 3/8" probe & imperial increments, 100'
$585.00
Drop ships from manufacturer
Geotech ET Portable Water Level Meters 82050013 ET portable well tape with field replaceable 5/8" probe & imperial increments, 200'
$702.00
Drop ships from manufacturer
Geotech ET Portable Water Level Meters 82050075 ET portable well tape with 3/8" probe & imperial increments, 200'
$713.00
Drop ships from manufacturer
Geotech ET Portable Water Level Meters 82050014 ET portable well tape with field replaceable 5/8" probe & imperial increments, 300'
$852.00
Drop ships from manufacturer
Geotech ET Portable Water Level Meters 82050076 ET portable well tape with 3/8" probe & imperial increments, 300'
$864.00
Drop ships from manufacturer
Geotech ET Portable Water Level Meters
82050012
ET portable well tape with field replaceable 5/8" probe & imperial increments, 100'
Drop ships from manufacturer
$575.00
Geotech ET Portable Water Level Meters
82050074
ET portable well tape with 3/8" probe & imperial increments, 100'
Drop ships from manufacturer
$585.00
Geotech ET Portable Water Level Meters
82050013
ET portable well tape with field replaceable 5/8" probe & imperial increments, 200'
Drop ships from manufacturer
$702.00
Geotech ET Portable Water Level Meters
82050075
ET portable well tape with 3/8" probe & imperial increments, 200'
Drop ships from manufacturer
$713.00
Geotech ET Portable Water Level Meters
82050014
ET portable well tape with field replaceable 5/8" probe & imperial increments, 300'
Drop ships from manufacturer
$852.00
Geotech ET Portable Water Level Meters
82050076
ET portable well tape with 3/8" probe & imperial increments, 300'
Drop ships from manufacturer
$864.00
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Geotech ET Water Level Meter Carrying Bag 12050059 ET water level meter carrying bag
$78.00
Drop ships from manufacturer
Geotech ET/ETL Replacement Probe 52050052 ET/ETL replacement probe, 5/8"
$60.00
Drop ships from manufacturer
ET water level meter carrying bag
Drop ships from manufacturer
$78.00
ET/ETL replacement probe, 5/8"
Drop ships from manufacturer
$60.00
The Geotech ET Water Level Meter is a portable instrument used to accurately measure water levels in monitoring wells. The well tape is mounted on an extremely durable polypropylene storage reel with rugged aluminum frame. The polyethylene-coated engineer's tape is accurate to 1/100th of a foot.

The sensor consists of a stainless steel and FEP probe, and it relies on fluid conductivity to determine the presence of water. When the instrument contacts water, an audible signal and visible green light activate. The well tape also features adjustable sensitivity, which is used to prevent false triggering.
Questions & Answers
Can I use a mild detergent to clean my water level meter?

The water level meter can be cleaned with any detergent such as trisodium phosphate (TSP), Alconox, or Luquinox. If other detergents are used, take care to select detergents that are compatible with TeflonĀ®, polypropylene, and stainless steel The reel should not be submerged in any liquid, but may be cleaned with a damp cloth. If the probe becomes covered with slit or mud, it may be cleaned with detergent and a soft bristle brush.

Please, mind that only logged in users can submit questions

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