86050001

Geotech ORS Interface Probes

Geotech ORS Interface Probes

Description

This probe accurately measures depth to hydrocarbon layers and water in monitoring wells and tanks.

Features

  • Measurements to depth of fluid are accurate to within 1/100'
  • Rugged, durable, lightweight construction
  • Factory Mutual Approved & intrinsically safe for use in Class 1, Division 1, Group D hazardous sites
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$1,990.00
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Details

The ORS Interface Probe is a handheld, battery powered device for measuring depth to water or oil in tanks or wells. The ORS Interface Probe can be used in numerous applications including measuring oil and water levels in monitoring wells, and obtaining accurate measurements of water levels in cascading wells.

This rugged and durable probe is accurate to 1/100' and can detect hydrocarbon layers as thin as 1/200'. Constructed of NEMA 3 weather resistant aluminum, it can fit into wells as small as 0.75" in diameter. The ORS interface probe is intrinsically safe and Factory Mutual Approved for use in Class 1, Division 1, and Group D hazardous locations. Includes tape cleaner attachment for preventing dirt and hydrocarbons from entering the reel assembly, probe, and measuring tape.
What's Included:
  • (1) ORS interface probe
  • (1) ABS carrying case
  • (1) Operations manual
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Geotech ORS Interface Probes 86050001 ORS small oil/water interface meter with 5/8" probe & English increments, 100'
$1990.00
Drop ships from manufacturer
Geotech ORS Interface Probes 86050004 ORS small oil/water interface meter with 5/8" probe & metric increments, 30m'
$1990.00
Drop ships from manufacturer
Geotech ORS Interface Probes 1068013 ORS standard oil/water interface meter with 1" probe & English increments, 100'
$2075.00
Drop ships from manufacturer
Geotech ORS Interface Probes 1068017 ORS standard oil/water interface meter with 1" probe & metric increments, 30m'
$2075.00
Drop ships from manufacturer
Geotech ORS Interface Probes 1068016 ORS chemical oil/water interface meter with 1" probe & English increments, 100'
$2650.00
Drop ships from manufacturer
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Geotech 2060010 Replacement prism assembly, ORS standard & chemical interface probes
$62.50
Drop ships from manufacturer

Questions & Answers

| Ask a Question
Can the probe be damaged by inorganic compounds in the water?
The standard probe is unaffected by most inorganic reagents. See the manual for a chemical resistance chart. If the resistance is poor, it is recommended to use the ORS Chemical Interface probe.
What size is the probe? How small of a well can I use it in?
The standard and chemically-resistant probes are 1" (25.4 mm) diameter cylinders that can be used in wells as small as 1-1/8" (29mm) in diameter. The small probe is 5/8" (0.625 mm) in diameter and can be used in wells with a 1" (25.4 mm) opening.
Does the probe issue a visual or audio alert when it senses liquid?
Both. An oscillating alarm indicates water and a continuous alarm indicates hydrocarbon.
How often should I clean my probe?
After every measurement, the probe should be washed in Alconox detergent, rinsed in distilled water, washed again in Alconox and rinsed for a final time in distilled water, Also clean all accessible parts of the reel assembly. Under some circumstances, a more aggressive cleaner may be required to prevent cross-contamination of wells.
How do I install the new prism assembly?
Ensure the probe is dry and remove the old prism. Keep the probe pointed downward, and thread the new prism into place, securing it finger tight. Then use a 3/4" wrench to firmly seat the o-ring. Be careful not to over tighten.
Why does my probe keep turning off?
The ORS interface probe includes a self shut-off circuit. If the probe has not sensed liquid within 4 minutes of powering on, it will automatically switch to a low power mode. Turn the probe OFF then ON again to restore full power.

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