Global Water RG600 Tipping Bucket Rain Gauges

Global Water's RG600 Tipping Bucket is a durable weather instrument for monitoring rain rate and total rainfall.

Features

  • Constructed of anodized aluminum
  • Reliable, highly accurate, and simple to operate
  • Rugged and long lasting
Your Price $621.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Global Water
Free Lifetime Tech SupportFree Lifetime Tech Support
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Global Water RG600 Tipping Bucket Rain GaugesEK0000 RG600 tipping bucket rain gauge, 0.01" per tip
$621.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Global Water RG600 Tipping Bucket Rain Gauges EK0100 RG650 heated tipping bucket rain gauge, 0.01" per tip
$1,107.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Global Water RG700 Pulse to 4-20mA Converter Module ELA000 RG700 pulse to 4-20mA converter
$382.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Spectrum WatchDog 1115 Rain Logger 3635WD1 WatchDog 1115 rain gauge data logger
$210.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Solinst Rainlogger Edge Rain Gauge Logger 111108 Rainlogger Edge rain gauge logger, includes 6' connection cable
$274.55
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Global Water's RG600 Tipping Bucket is a durable weather instrument for monitoring rain rate and total rainfall. With minimal care, the tipping bucket will provide many years of services. All Global Water tipping buckets were designed by the National Weather Service to provide a low-investment, reliable, industrial, tipping bucket rain gauge.

Its simple design assures trouble-free operation, yet provides accurate rainfall measurements. The tipping bucket has an 8" orifice and is shipped complete with mounting brackets and 25 ft. of 2-conductor cable. The tipping bucket sensor mechanism activates a sealed reed switch that produces a contact closure for each 0.01" or 0.2 mm of rainfall. The tipping bucket rain gauge can be pole mounted or bolted to a level plate.
  • Capacity: Unlimited
  • Accuracy: +/-1% at 1 inch per hour
  • Average Switch Closure Time: 135 ms
  • Maximum Bounce Settling Time: 0.75 ms
  • Maximum Switch Rating: 30 VDC @ 2A, 115 VAC @ 1 A
  • Operating Temperature: 32 to +123.8 F (0 to +51 C)
  • Dimensions: 10.125" x 8" inch (26cm x 20cm)
  • Shipping Weight: 8 lbs. (3.6 kg)
  • Cable: 25 ft (7.6 m), 2 conductor
  • (1) Tipping bucket rain gauge
  • (1) Set of mounting brackets
  • (1) 25 ft. length of 2-conductor cable
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