EFA000

Global Water WE710 Surface Temperature Sensor

Global Water WE710 Surface Temperature Sensor

Description

The Global Water WE710 Surface Temperature Sensor is a precision RTD sensor calibrated to US National Standards.

Features

  • Well suited for solar panel temperature or battery monitoring
  • Sensor output is 4-20 mA with a two wire configuration
  • Each sensor is mounted on 25 ft of marine-grade cable
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List Price
$370.00
Your Price
$351.50
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

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Details

The Global Water WE710 Surface Temperature Sensor is a precision RTD sensor calibrated to US National Standards. The surface temperature sensor's output is 4-20mA with a two wire configuration. Each surface temperature sensor is mounted on 25 ft of marine grade cable, with lengths up to 500 ft available. The electronics are completely encapsulated in marine-grade epoxy within an ABS plastic housing.

The surface temperature sensors are well suited for many different temperature monitoring applications including green roofs, solar panels, water tanks, control panels, batteries, and many others. To accurately measure temperature, the sensor should be mounted in direct contact with the surface to be measured. Using the included silicone heat transfer compound will ensure that temperature transfer from the monitored surface to the sensor's heatsink will be efficient, minimizing the impact of ambient temperature on the measurement.
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Global Water WE710 Surface Temperature Sensor EFA000 WE710 surface temperature sensor, 25 ft. cable
$351.50
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Global Water DH0000 Extra sensor cable, priced per foot
$2.19
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Additional Product Information:

Questions & Answers

| Ask a Question
What applications is this designed for?
The WE710 surface temperature sensor is designed for any flat-surface monitoring including on solar panels, pipes, water tanks and control panels.
What is the operating range?
The Global Water surface temperature sensor is designed to measure temperatures from -50 to 85 degrees Celsius.

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