225100

Hach Sulfate Test Kit

Hach Sulfate Test Kit

Description

Sulfate Test Kit, Model SF-1, 50-200 mg/L, 100 Tests, Extinction Method

Features

  • Everything you need to measure sulfate concentration
  • Results calculated from extinction method
  • Contents fit conveniently in the polypropylene carrying case
Your Price
$88.89
Usually ships in 3-5 days

Shipping Information
Return Policy
Why Buy From Fondriest?
Notable Specifications:
  • Method: Turbidimetric
  • Range: 50 to 200 mg/L
  • Reagents: Powder pillows
What's Included:
  • (100) Sulfate reagent powder pillows
  • (1) Graduated Cylinder
  • (1) Sample Cell
  • (1) Sample Cell Cover
  • (1) Dip Stick
  • (1) Clipper
  • (1) Polypropylene carrying case
  • Instructions
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Hach Sulfate Test Kit 225100 Sulfate Test Kit, Model SF-1, 50-200 mg/L, 100 Tests, Extinction Method
$88.89
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Additional Product Information:

Questions & Answers

| Ask a Question
Can you use this to measure soil sulfate?
No, this test kit is designed for use with liquid samples, not soil.
Why are there fingernail clippers in this kit?
The clippers are used to open the SulfaVer 4 Powder Pillows.

In The News

Unique monitoring network shows declining sulfate in Northeast streams

Sulfate concentrations continue to decline in Northeast U.S. streams, according to a new analysis of 40-years' worth of water quality data from relatively pristine watersheds across the country. The analysis shows the effectiveness of the Clean Air Act and the value of a unique stream monitoring network that has faced frequent threats of having its budget cut. The U.S. Geological Survey's Hydrologic Benchmark Network covers stream sites in watersheds that have seen little disturbance from humans through activities like urban development, agriculture or dam building. The HBN launched in 1963 and once had as many as 59 sites, but has since been slimmed down to 37. A USGS gauge measures streamflow at each site and a smaller set of sites are sampled for water chemistry.

Read More

Buoy Data Powers Muskegon Lake Hypoxia Research

Sixty years ago, the famous ecologist George Evelyn Hutchinson wrote, “A skillful limnologist can possibly learn more about the nature of a lake from a series of oxygen determinations than from any other chemical data.†Since then, oxygen measurements have only grown more relevant as the problem of hypoxia expands in lakes, oceans and estuaries across the globe.   But ecologists’ ability to measure oxygen has grown too. When Hutchison wrote that in 1957,  the “series of oxygen determinations†produced by a data buoy like the one floating on Muskegon Lake in Michigan was unthinkable.

Read More

Long-Term Monitoring Aids Scientists Studying Sea Star Wasting Mystery

Scientists working to solve the mystery of Sea Star Wasting Disease—and to learn more about the possible keystone species Pisaster ochraceus , the ochre sea star—are reaping the benefits of long-term monitoring of the species along the West Coast. Dr. Melissa Miner , a UC Santa Cruz researcher in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, spoke with EM about her two decades of work with the Multi-Agency Rocky Intertidal Network and her recent efforts surrounding the ochre sea star. Keeping an eye on intertidal species In 2013, people began to notice that sea stars all along the West Coast were in the grip of a strange disease. The stars exhibited lesions and quickly succumbed, deteriorating and wasting away.

Read More