Hach Sulfate Test Kit

Sulfate Test Kit, Model SF-1, 50-200 mg/L, 100 Tests, Extinction Method

Features

  • Everything you need to measure sulfate concentration
  • Results calculated from extinction method
  • Contents fit conveniently in the polypropylene carrying case
Your Price $95.89
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Hach
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Hach Sulfate Test Kit225100 Sulfate Test Kit, Model SF-1, 50-200 mg/L, 100 Tests, Extinction Method
$95.89
Usually ships in 3-5 days
  • Method: Turbidimetric
  • Range: 50 to 200 mg/L
  • Reagents: Powder pillows
  • (100) Sulfate reagent powder pillows
  • (1) Graduated Cylinder
  • (1) Sample Cell
  • (1) Sample Cell Cover
  • (1) Dip Stick
  • (1) Clipper
  • (1) Polypropylene carrying case
  • Instructions
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