225100

Hach Sulfate Test Kit

Hach Sulfate Test Kit

Description

Sulfate Test Kit, Model SF-1, 50-200 mg/L, 100 Tests, Extinction Method

Features

  • Everything you need to measure sulfate concentration
  • Results calculated from extinction method
  • Contents fit conveniently in the polypropylene carrying case
Your Price
$88.89
Usually ships in 3-5 days

Shipping Information
Return Policy
Why Buy From Fondriest?
Notable Specifications:
  • Method: Turbidimetric
  • Range: 50 to 200 mg/L
  • Reagents: Powder pillows
What's Included:
  • (100) Sulfate reagent powder pillows
  • (1) Graduated Cylinder
  • (1) Sample Cell
  • (1) Sample Cell Cover
  • (1) Dip Stick
  • (1) Clipper
  • (1) Polypropylene carrying case
  • Instructions
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Hach Sulfate Test Kit 225100 Sulfate Test Kit, Model SF-1, 50-200 mg/L, 100 Tests, Extinction Method
$88.89
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Additional Product Information:

Questions & Answers

| Ask a Question
Can you use this to measure soil sulfate?
No, this test kit is designed for use with liquid samples, not soil.
Why are there fingernail clippers in this kit?
The clippers are used to open the SulfaVer 4 Powder Pillows.

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