Hach Chloride (Mercuric Nitrate) Reagent Set

Chloride reagent set, mercuric nitrate method, 10 - 8,000 mg/L, 100 tests

Features

  • Mercuric nitrate method
  • 10 - 8,000 mg/L
  • Powder pillows and titration cartridges
Your Price $97.05
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Hach
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Hach Chloride (Mercuric Nitrate) Reagent Set2272600 Chloride reagent set, mercuric nitrate method, 10 - 8,000 mg/L, 100 tests
$97.05
Usually ships in 3-5 days
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Hach Digital Titrator 1690001 Digital titrator
$190.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
The sample is titrated with Silver Nitrate Standard Solution in the presence of potassium chromate (from the Chloride 2 Indicator Powder). The silver nitrate reacts with the chloride present to produce insoluble white silver chloride. After all the chloride has been precipitated, the silver ions react with the excess chromate present to form a red-brown silver chromate precipitate, marking the end point of the titration.
  • Range: 10 - 8,000 mg/L
  • (100) Diphenylcarbazone reagent powder pillows
  • (1) Mercuric nitrate titration cartridge, 0.2256 N
  • (1) Mercuric nitrate titration cartridge, 2.256 N
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