Hach m-ColiBlue24 Broth Glass Ampules

m-ColiBlue24 Broth accurately monitors and evaluates total coliform bacteria and E. coli in drinking water, wastewater, surface water and ground water.

Features

  • Results for total coliforms and E. coli in just 24 hours
  • Ready-to-use media eliminates preparation steps and additional equipment
  • Maximum shelf life
Your Price $60.85
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Hach m-ColiBlue24 Broth Glass Ampules2608420 m-ColiBlue24 broth, glass ampules, pack of 20
$60.85
Drop ships from manufacturer
Hach m-ColiBlue24 Broth Glass Ampules
2608420
m-ColiBlue24 broth, glass ampules, pack of 20
Drop ships from manufacturer
$60.85

Hach's m-ColiBlue24 Broth provides simultaneous monitoring and evaluating for total coliform bacteria and E. coli in drinking water, surface water, ground water, wastewater and chemical processing and pharmaceutical processing waters. Accurate to 1 CFU/100 mL, m-ColiBlue24 minimizes growth of other bacteria, reducing false positives and negatives. The convenience of prepared media eliminates extra steps and equipment for faster, cost-efficient testing. Using different indicating colors, red and blue for coliform and blue for E. coli, colonies can easily be identified on one petri dish with optimal recovery of stressed and injured organisms.

m-ColiBlue24 is only compatible with pads from Pall Corporation (e.g., Sterile Petri Dishes with Absorbant Pads), Private Label/OEM products manufactured by Pall Gelman, Sartorius (cellulose and glass fiber pads), and Sartorius BioSart products with the integrated Petri dish.

(20) m-ColiBlue24 broth glass ampules
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