Hach pH Gel-Filled Combination Electrode

Hach pH gel-filled combination electrode with 5-pin connector and manual

Features

  • pH glass that can be used in a wide variety of applications, especially at extreme levels of pH
  • Silver/silver chloride reference element with a glass frit junction
  • Reliable electrode designed for general purpose pH measurement
Your Price $341.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Hach
Government and Educational PricingGovernment and Educational Pricing
Free Lifetime Tech SupportFree Lifetime Tech Support
Free Ground ShippingFree Ground Shipping
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Hach pH Gel-Filled Combination Electrode5193500 pH gel-filled combination electrode with 5-pin connector and manual
$341.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Hach pH Gel-Filled Combination Electrode
5193500
pH gel-filled combination electrode with 5-pin connector and manual
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$341.00
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Hach pH Electrode Storage Powder Pillows 2657364 pH electrode storage powder pillows, 25mL sample, 20 tests
$37.99
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Hach Soaker Bottle for pH Electrode 5192900 Soaker bottle for pH electrode
$7.35
Usually ships in 3-5 days
pH electrode storage powder pillows, 25mL sample, 20 tests
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$37.99
Hach Soaker Bottle for pH Electrode
5192900
Soaker bottle for pH electrode
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$7.35

The Hach pH Gel-Filled Combination Electrode is a reliable electrode designed for general purpose pH measurement. The electrode uses a silver/silver chloride reference element with a glass frit junction and a full-range pH glass that can be used in a wide variety of applications, especially at extreme levels of pH. If using the sensION System, the meter will automatically account for buffer temperatures during calibration and factor the information into the reported pH. The Auto Buffer Recognition/Auto Temperature Compensation calibration program built into sension meters contains accurate pH profiles for buffers of pH 4.01, 6.86, 7.00, and 10.01 at temperatures from 0 to 60 C.

  • Range: 0-14 pH units
  • Isopotential Point: 7.00 +/-0.5 pH units (0 +/-29 mV)
  • Electrode Resistance: 250 Mohms at 25 C (new)
  • Slope: -58 +/-3 mV at 25 C
  • Temp Range: 0 to 45 C (routine use), 0 to 100 C (occasional use), -40 to 50 C (storage)
  • Reference Half Cell: Ag/AgCl
  • Tip Diameter: 12 mm (0.472 inches)
  • Total Length: 152.4 mm (6 inches)
  • Cable Length: 0.91 m (36 inches)
  • Cable Connector: 5-Pin Connector
  • (1)Hach pH Gel-Filled Combination Electrode
  • (1) Operations manual
Questions & Answers
No Questions
Please, mind that only logged in users can submit questions

In The News

Ocean acidification: University of Washington's giant plastic bags help control research conditions

With oceans becoming more acidic worldwide, scientists are getting creative in designing experiments to study them. For example, one group at the University of Washington is using giant plastic bags to study ocean acidification. Each bag holds about 3,000 liters of seawater and sits in a cylinder-like cage for stability. The group at UW, made up of professors and students, is controlling carbon dioxide levels in the bags over a nearly three-week period, during which they are looking at the effects of increased acidity on organisms living near the San Juan Islands. “These mesocosms are a way to do a traditional experiment you might do in a lab or classroom,” said Jim Murray, professor of oceanography at the University of Washington.

Read More

NOAA Alaska buoy network to monitor North Pacific ocean acidification

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration scientists detected signs of ocean acidification in the waters that hold the vulnerable and valuable fisheries of the North Pacific off the coast of Alaska, but they only had a snapshot of the action. “We know that in this place were important commercial and subsistence fisheries that could be at risk from ocean acidification,” said Jeremy Mathis, a NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory researcher and professor at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. To understand how ocean acidification affects the North Pacific, NOAA scientists created a mooring network that collects constant in situ data on parameters contributing to acidification. They hope it will reveal seasonal trends and patterns left out by their snapshots.

Read More

Snowmelt, Stormwater and Contamination in Saskatoon

In Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, pollution and runoff from storms and snowmelt are getting the close look they deserve, and there’s much more to examine. Weather, from heavy spring storms to long months of snow and freezing temperatures, makes the polluting potential of runoff and snowmelt greater than and different from warmer climate cities, said Garry Codling in an email. In Saskatoon, potentially harmful elements in runoff can exceed the guidelines for runoff set by the Canadian government.

Read More