Hach sensION+ 9662 Nitrate Ion Selective Electrode

Hach sensION+ 9662 nitrate ion selective electrode is a half-cell (reference not integrated) nitrate ion selective electrode (ISE) with an epoxy body and non-replaceable, solid-state PVC (polymer) membrane selective to nitrate ions in solution.

Features

  • Utilizes a unique solid-state sensor technology, eliminating costly membrane replacements
  • Requires little maintenance
  • Provides fast, stable, and accurate response in a variety of sample types
Your Price $618.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
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Hach sensION+ 9662 Nitrate Ion Selective ElectrodeLZW9662.97.0002 sensION+ 9662 nitrate ion selective electrode (ISE), sensor only
$618.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days

The Hach sensION+ 9662 nitrate ion selective electrode is a half-cell (reference not integrated) nitrate ion selective electrode (ISE) with an epoxy body and non-replaceable, solid-state PVC (polymer) membrane selective to nitrate ions in solution. It is recommended for use with the sensION+ 5044 reference electrode. The 9662 has a fixed 1 meter cable and BNC connector for laboratory use with the Hach sensION+ MM374 Multimeter. The 9662 is ideal for measuring nitrate concentrations in drinking water, wastewater and general water quality applications.

 

The Hach sensION+ 9662 nitrate ion selective electrode utilizes a unique solid-state sensor technology that eliminates costly membrane replacements, whereas traditional PVC-membrane ISEs require membrane replacement every 2-3 months. The 9663 ISE’s unique solid-state sensor technology eliminates the need for frequent membrane replacement by using a solid gel ion exchange behind the ion-selective membrane versus the liquid ion exchange used in most ISEs. This design allows users to get up to 2 years of life from their ISE without membrane replacement – saving the time and costly expense of frequently exchanging membranes.

 

The solid-state sensor design requires little maintenance and allows for dry storage of the ISE without a shelf life or membrane replacement. Ultimately, the 9662 provides fast, stable and accurate response in a variety of sample types.

  • Dimensions (D x L): 12 mm x 120 mm
  • Material Sensor Body: ABS
  • Temperature Range: 5 to 40 °C
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