Hach Sterile Whirl-Pak Bags

Hach's Sterile Whirl-Pak Bags are specially designed for chlorinated water samples and comply with USEPA and Standard Methods criteria.

Features

  • Complies with USEPA and Standard Methods criteria
  • Specially designed for chlorinated water samples
  • Transparent polyethylene material is sterile (certified) and disposable
Your Price $36.35
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Hach
Free Lifetime Tech SupportFree Lifetime Tech Support
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Hach Sterile Whirl-Pak Bags2075333 Sterile Whirl-Pak Bags with Dechlorinating Agent, 177 mL, pack of 100
$36.35
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Hach's Sterile Whirl-Pak Bags are specially designed for chlorinated water samples and comply with USEPA and Standard Methods criteria. The transparent polyethylene material is disposable and features a Whirl-Pak closure. The bags a contain non-nutritive pill with 10 mg sodium thiosulfate that will dechlorinate up to 10 mg/Cl2 in a 100 mL sample. Each bag has four ounce and 100 mL fill-lines and a 'write-on' strip that accepts waterproof ink.
  • Capacity: 100 mL
  • Quantity: 100 bags per pack
Questions & Answers
No Questions
Please, mind that only logged in users can submit questions

In The News

For Living Waters for the World, the mission is clean drinking water

In Tabasco, Mexico, water is left undrinkable by mineral deposits in soil and a coastal aquifer that runs beneath the Yucatan Peninsula. Many communities can’t treat it and depend on trucks to bring in drinking water. But for one small community there, a mission group helped reduce its dependence on outside water by setting up and donating a custom water filtration system. A church houses the system and gives treated water to those who can’t afford it at no cost. The water is otherwise sold commercially at half the price offered by other bottlers. Living Waters for the World is a mission project of the Presbyterian Church - USA and is no stranger to water treatment projects.

Read More

Monitoring for Runup Signals to Reduce Sneaker Wave Risk

Around the world, the occasional phenomenon known as sneaker waves poses a threat to beachgoers. Unusually large sneaker waves in 2016 and 2018 prompted Oregon State University (OSU) researchers to investigate these mysterious events. The research revealed the presence of runup signals that can provide earlier warnings to officials, reducing risk from these dangerous events. Dr. Tuba Ozkan-Haller of OSU spoke to EM about the research . “Sneaker waves occur in the Pacific Northwest, but they're also a worldwide phenomenon,” explains Dr. Ozkan-Haller. “Certain kinds of coastlines appear to be more well-suited to the occurrence of these waves. There are some characteristics that we know play into it, but there's still a lot of unknowns too.

Read More

Utah’s Canyonlands Research Center: A Great Study Location for Climate Effects on Ecosystem Processes, Community Dynamics and More

Canyonlands Research Center (CRC) is situated at The Nature Conservancy’s Dugout Ranch , over 5,200 private acres of research study area. One of CRC’s primary roles is to facilitate research and monitoring work of university and federal researchers. CRC is located adjacent to Canyonlands National Park , which extends over more than 337,000 acres of public land. CRC also partners with many organizations, including the Bureau of Land Management, USFS, NPS, USGS, Utah State University, and the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources to identify the most pressing research needs in this region.

Read More