Hach Sterile Whirl-Pak Bags

Hach's Sterile Whirl-Pak Bags are specially designed for chlorinated water samples and comply with USEPA and Standard Methods criteria.

Features

  • Complies with USEPA and Standard Methods criteria
  • Specially designed for chlorinated water samples
  • Transparent polyethylene material is sterile (certified) and disposable
Your Price $36.35
Usually ships in 3-5 days
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Hach Sterile Whirl-Pak Bags2075333 Sterile Whirl-Pak Bags with Dechlorinating Agent, 177 mL, pack of 100
$36.35
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Hach's Sterile Whirl-Pak Bags are specially designed for chlorinated water samples and comply with USEPA and Standard Methods criteria. The transparent polyethylene material is disposable and features a Whirl-Pak closure. The bags a contain non-nutritive pill with 10 mg sodium thiosulfate that will dechlorinate up to 10 mg/Cl2 in a 100 mL sample. Each bag has four ounce and 100 mL fill-lines and a 'write-on' strip that accepts waterproof ink.
  • Capacity: 100 mL
  • Quantity: 100 bags per pack
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