Heron dipper-See H2GO Underwater Drop Camera

The Heron dipper-See H2GO is a self-contained, high-powered, low-cost illuminated underwater inspection camera.

Features

  • Most portable borehole camera in the world
  • Record up to 4.5 hours of bright, crystal clear 1080p HD video
  • Long term logging mode captures 20 second clips every hour for up to 1-month
List Price $1,850.00
Your Price $1,757.50
Stock Drop Ships From Manufacturer  
  • Camera Probe Centralizer Kit (with clamp, and interchangeable 4” & 6” guides)
  • #2 Phillips Screwdriver for changing centralizer guides
  • 1m USB-C Charging Cable w/ Wall Plug
  • 75m/250ft Deployment Cord
  • 64GB microSD with SD Card Adapter
  • SD Card Removal Assistance Tool
  • User Manual
  • Ultra-Rugged Carrying Case (IP67)
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dipper-See H2GO underwater drop camera
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