In-Situ Replacement RDO Classic Sensor Cap Kit

In-Situ RDO PRO Replacement Sensor Cap Kit includes cap, O-rings, lens wipe, and O-ring grease

Features

  • Cap has a 2-year life from the date of manufacture
  • Cap has a 1-year life after the instrument takes its first sensor reading
  • For use with RDO PRO probe purchased prior to Jan. 1, 2014
Your Price $145.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
In-Situ
Free Lifetime Tech SupportFree Lifetime Tech Support
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
In-Situ Replacement RDO Classic Sensor Cap Kit0084230 Replacement RDO classic sensor cap kit
$145.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
In-Situ RDO PRO-X Calibration Kit 0082250 RDO PRO-X calibration kit, includes calibration cup and 500mL Sodium Sulfite solution
$65.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
In-Situ RDO PRO-X Optical Dissolved Oxygen Sensor 0088690 RDO PRO-X optical dissolved oxygen sensor, 10m cable
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Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

The In-Situ RDO PRO Replacement Sensor Cap Kit has a life of 24 months from the date of manufacture, or 12 months from the first reading, whichever comes first. To guarantee accuracy and a full 12-month working life, the customer should store the cap in its factory packaging prior to use, and install by the date printed on the label.

Win-Situ 5 software will begin warning the user when 90 days of sensor cap life remain. The user can then choose to be reminded again in a certain number of days (e.g., 30 days, 5 days, etc.).

The RDO PRO sensor cap is very robust and resistant to damage. A maximum storage time of 12 months prior to installation is recommended so that a full 12 months of cap usage is achieved. Therefore, it is not advisable to stock a large quantity of replacement caps, unless your monitoring conditions necessitate this.

  • (1) RDO PRO sensor cap
  • (2) O-rings
  • (1) O-ring lubricant
  • (1) Lens wipe
  • (1) Instruction sheet
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