LI-COR LI-250A Carrying Case

LI-COR LI-250A Carrying Case
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In The News

LI-COR PAR sensors detect light waves to aid aquatic ecosystem research

Understanding how the sun’s rays fuel phytoplankton or plant growth may prove valuable to understanding an aquatic ecosystem. A pair of sensors from LI-COR can help researchers studying algal blooms and aquatic vegetation by measuring how much light enters underwater environments. Sitting below the surface, the LI-192 flat-lensed photosynthetically active radiation sensor and the LI-193 spherical PAR sensor measure light waves striking their silicon photovoltaic detectors.  They sense light wavelengths between 400 and 700 nanometers, which is the ideal range for photosynthesis. Dave Johnson, a LI-COR product manager for the LI-190 series, said the sensors’ individual designs make them ideal for different applications.

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Ohio State greenhouse nurtures 'fruit fly of the plant world'

The Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center at Ohio State University was established in 1991 with funding from the National Science Foundation. Part of the center’s job is to meet demand for seed of the arabidopsis plant, which is widely used for genetic modeling. “A lot of the plants we’re growing are for seed production,” said Joan Leonard, greenhouse coordinator. “Arabidopsis is a good example. We call it the ‘fruit fly of the plant world,’ and it takes about six to eight weeks to go from seed to plant.” Arabidopsis is one of the many plants that will benefit from a new LI-COR PAR sensor being installed on campus. It will help manage light schedules for greenhouse plants.

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Extreme Wave Heights, Ocean Winds Increasing Globally

Around the world, extreme wave heights and ocean winds are increasing. The greatest increase is happening in the Southern Ocean, according to recent research from the University of Melbourne , and Dr. Ian Young corresponded with EM about what inspired the work. “Our main interest is ocean waves, and we are interested in wind because it generates waves,” explains Dr. Young. “Ocean waves are important for the design of coastal and offshore structures, the erosion of beaches and coastal flooding, and the safety of shipping.” Waves also have a role in determining how much heat, energy and gas can be trapped in the ocean. “The major reason why changes in wave height may be important is because of sea level rise,” details Dr. Young.

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