Lufft WS100 Radar Precipitation Sensor

The Lufft WS100 radar precipitation sensor accurately measures rain, snow, sleet, freezing rain, and hail using a 24 GHz Doppler radar.

Features

  • 24GHz Doppler radar measures precipitation drop speed and calculates quantity & type
  • Easily mounts to 2" diameter pipe with integrated bracket mount & U-bolts
  • SDI-12 output for integration with NexSens and other data loggers
Your Price $1,313.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Lufft
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Lufft WS100 Radar Precipitation Sensor8367.U04 WS100 radar precipitation sensor, 10m cable
$1,313.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Lufft WS100 Radar Precipitation Sensor
8367.U04
WS100 radar precipitation sensor, 10m cable
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
$1,313.00
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Lufft WS-Series Sensor Interface Cables 8370.UKAB20 Sensor interface cable, 20m
$191.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Lufft WS-Series Sensor Interface Cables 8370.UKAB100 Sensor interface cable, 100m
$495.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Lufft Surge Protector 8379.USP Surge protector
$317.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Sensor interface cable, 20m
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
$191.00
Lufft WS-Series Sensor Interface Cables
8370.UKAB100
Sensor interface cable, 100m
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
$495.00
Surge protector
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
$317.00

Overview
The Lufft family of multi-parameter weather sensors offer a cost-effective, compact alternative for the acquisition of a variety of measurement parameters on land- and buoy-based weather stations. Depending on the model, each sensor will measure a different combination of weather parameters to meet a wide variety of applications.

Precipitation

Tried and tested radar technology is used to measure precipitation. The precipitation sensor works with a 24GHz Doppler radar, which measures the drop speed and calculates precipitation quantity and type by correlating drop size and speed.

  • Precipitation
  • Principle: Radar
  • Measuring Range: 0.3mm to 5.0mm
  • Liquid Precipitation Resolution: 0.01 / 0.1 / 0.2 / 0.5 / 1.0 mm (pulse interface)
  • Precipitation Types: Rain, Snow, Sleet, Freezing Rain, Hail
  • Accuracy: +/-10%
  • Technical Data
  • Interface: SDI-12, Modbus
  • Operating Temperature: -40 to +60 C
  • Operating Humidity: 0 to 100% RH
  • Included Cable Length: 10m
  • (1) WS100 Radar Precipitation Sensor
  • (1) 10m sensor cable
  • (1) Operations manual
Questions & Answers
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