Lufft WS501 Multi-Parameter Weather Sensor

The Lufft WS501 Multi-Parameter Weather Sensor integrates the Kipp & Zonen CMP 3 pyranometer along with sensors for air temperature, humidity, pressure, solar radiation & wind.

Features

  • Spectral range of 300 to 2800 nautical miles
  • Easily mounts to 2" diameter pipe with integrated bracket mount & U-bolts
  • SDI-12 output for integration with NexSens and other data loggers
$4,289.00
Stock 3AVAILABLE
Lufft WS501 Multi-Parameter Weather Sensor

Overview
The Lufft family of multi-parameter weather sensors offer a cost-effective, compact alternative for the acquisition of a variety of measurement parameters on land- and buoy-based weather stations. Depending on the model, each sensor will measure a different combination of weather parameters to meet a wide variety of applications. The Lufft WS501 is a multi-parameter weather sensor that integrates the Kipp & ZonencmP 3 pyranometer and sensors for air temperature, humidity, pressure, solar radiation & wind.

Air Temperature & Humidity
Temperature is measured using a highly accurate NTC-resistor, while humidity is measured using a capacitive humidity sensor. Both sensors are located in a ventilated radiation shield to reduce the effects of solar radiation.

Pressure
Absolute air pressure is measured using a built-in MEMS sensor. The relative air pressure referenced to sea level is calculated using the barometric formula with the aid of the local altitude, which is user-configurable on the equipment.

Wind Speed & Direction
The wind sensor uses four ultrasound sensors which take cyclical measurements in all directions. The resulting wind speed and direction are calculated from the measured run-time sound differential.

Compass
The integrated electronic compass can be used to check the north-south adjustment of the sensor housing for wind direction measurement. It is also used to calculate the compass-corrected wind direction.

Solar Radiation
The pyranometer is intended for shortwave global solar radiation measurements in the spectral range from 300 to 2800nm. The thermopile sensor construction measures the solar energy that is received from the total solar spectrum and the whole hemisphere. The output is expressed in Watts per square meter.

  • Air Temperature
  • Principle: NTC
  • Measuring Range: -50 to +60 C
  • Resolution: 0.1 C (-20 to +50 C); otherwise 0.2 C
  • Accuracy: +/-0.2 C (-20 to +50 C); otherwise +/-0.5 C
  • Units: C; F
  • Humidity
  • Principle: Capacitive
  • Measuring Range: 0 to 100% RH
  • Resolution: 0.1% RH
  • Accuracy: +/-2% RH
  • Units: % RH; g/m3; g/kg
  • Pressure
  • Principle: Capacitive
  • Measuring Range: 300 to 1200hPa
  • Resolution: 0.1hPa
  • Accuracy: +/-1.5hPa
  • Unit: hPa
  • Radiation
  • Response Time (95%): 18s
  • Non-Stability (change/year): ±1%
  • Non-Linearity (0 to 1,000 W/m2): ±2.5%
  • Directional Error (at 80° with 1,000 W/m2): ±20 W/m2
  • Temperature Dependence of Sensitivity: ±5% (–10 to +40° C)
  • Tilt Error (at 1000 W/m2): ±3%
  • Spectral Range (50% points): 300 to 2,800 nm
  • Measuring Range: 1400 W/m2
  • Wind Speed
  • Principle: Ultrasonic
  • Measuring Range: 0 to 60m/s
  • Resolution: 0.1m/s
  • Accuracy: +/-0.3m/s or 3% (0 to 35m/s); +/-5% (>35m/s)
  • Response Threshold: 0.3m/s
  • Units: m/s; km/h; mph; kts
  • Wind Direction
  • Principle: Ultrasonic
  • Measuring Range: 0 to 359.9 degrees
  • Resolution: 0.1 degrees
  • Accuracy: +/-3 degrees
  • Response Threshold: 0.3m/s
  • Compass
  • Principle: Integrated Electronic Compass
  • Measuring Range: 0 to 359.9 degrees
  • Resolution: 1.0 degree
  • Technical Data
  • Interface: SDI-12, Modbus
  • Operating Temperature: -50 to +60 C
  • Operating Humidity: 0 to 100% RH
  • Included Cable Length: 10m
  • (1) WS501 Multi-Parameter Weather Sensor
  • (1) 10m sensor cable
  • (1) Operations manual
Questions & Answers
No Questions
Did you find what you were looking for?

Select Options

  Products 0 Item Selected
Image
Part #
Description
Price
Stock
Quantity
Lufft WS501 Multi-Parameter Weather Sensor
L8375.U01
WS501 multi-parameter weather sensor, air temperature, humidity, pressure, solar radiation & wind, 10m cable
$4,289.00
3 Available
  Accessories 0 Item Selected
Notice: At least 1 product is not available to purchase online
×
Multiple Products

have been added to your cart

There are items in your cart.

Cart Subtotal: $xxx.xx

Go to Checkout

In The News

Duality of Science: The Importance of Science Communication for Promoting Change

It is no secret that in today's world, most scientists do not stick exclusively to science–they must be educators, communicators, and advocates. The looming threats facing the planet's climate and the growing distrust in science by the public have forced scientists to expand and improve their capacity for science communication to the world.  From repeatedly testifying before the U.S. Congress to winning an Emmy as the Chief Scientific Advisor for an award-winning nature documentary, marine ecologist James W. Porter has been thrust into the public eye.

Read More

Thin Ice: Monitoring Winter Lake Dynamics at Mohonk Lake

Historically, water quality monitoring during the winter has been difficult and often avoided altogether—however, monitoring throughout the year can highlight the influence of various environmental stressors and track the changes systems undergo during the winter. In particular, long-term monitoring efforts in systems like Mohonk Lake can underline the effects of climate change and acid rain. David Richardson, a professor of biology at the  State University of New York (SUNY) at New Paltz , spends his time outside of the classroom monitoring the nearby watersheds. After getting his engineering undergraduate degree, Richardson realized he wasn't interested in the typical job offerings and applied to an ecological science graduate program at the University of Maryland.

Read More

Protecting Natural Resources: Long-Term Monitoring in Acadia National Park

The United States' national parks are visited by millions of people each year, providing opportunities to experience the local beauty of the U.S. A core mission of the National Park Service (NPS) is to protect and preserve these unique areas since they are not totally free of pollution and the influence of climate change. As such, national parks are the site of many environmental monitoring programs designed to assess the effects of global stressors like climate change and pollution on park resources. Acadia National Park's water and air monitoring programs are examples of this, providing a long-term data history documenting changes in air and water quality over the past four decades.

Read More