Lufft WS503 Multi-Parameter Weather Sensor

The Lufft WS503 Multi-Parameter Weather Sensor simultaneously measures air temperature, humidity, pressure, solar radiation & wind with a tiltable CMP 3 pyranometer.

Features

  • Integrated tiltable Kipp & Zonen CMP 3 pyranometer for solar radiation measurements
  • Easily mounts to 2" diameter pipe with integrated bracket mount & U-bolts
  • SDI-12 output for integration with NexSens and other data loggers
Your Price $4,392.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Lufft
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Lufft WS503 Multi-Parameter Weather Sensor8375.U11 WS503 multi-parameter weather sensor, air temperature, humidity, pressure, tiltable solar radiation & wind, 10m cable
$4,392.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Lufft WT1 Surface Temperature Sensor 8160.WT1 WT1 surface temperature sensor, 10m cable
$336.00
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Lufft WTB100 Tipping Bucket Rain Gauge 8353.10 WTB100 tipping bucket rain gauge, 0.2mm per tip, 10m cable
$550.00
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Lufft WS-Series Sensor Interface Cables 8370.UKAB20 Sensor interface cable, 20m
$191.00
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Lufft WS-Series Sensor Interface Cables 8370.UKAB100 Sensor interface cable, 100m
$495.00
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Lufft Surge Protector 8379.USP Surge protector
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Overview
The Lufft family of multi-parameter weather sensors offer a cost-effective, compact alternative for the acquisition of a variety of measurement parameters on land- and buoy-based weather stations. Depending on the model, each sensor will measure a different combination of weather parameters to meet a wide variety of applications.

Air Temperature & Humidity
Temperature is measured using a highly accurate NTC-resistor, while humidity is measured using a capacitive humidity sensor. Both sensors are located in a ventilated radiation shield to reduce the effects of solar radiation.

Pressure
Absolute air pressure is measured using a built-in MEMS sensor. The relative air pressure referenced to sea level is calculated using the barometric formula with the aid of the local altitude, which is user-configurable on the equipment.

Wind Speed & Direction
The wind sensor uses four ultrasound sensors which take cyclical measurements in all directions. The resulting wind speed and direction are calculated from the measured run-time sound differential.

Compass
The integrated electronic compass can be used to check the north-south adjustment of the sensor housing for wind direction measurement. It is also used to calculate the compass-corrected wind direction.

Solar Radiation
The tiltable pyranometer is intended for shortwave global solar radiation measurements in the spectral range from 300 to 2800nm. The thermopile sensor construction measures the solar energy that is received from the total solar spectrum and the whole hemisphere. The output is expressed in Watts per square meter.

  • Air Temperature
  • Principle: NTC
  • Measuring Range: -50 to +60 C
  • Resolution: 0.1 C (-20 to +50 C); otherwise 0.2 C
  • Accuracy: +/-0.2 C (-20 to +50 C); otherwise +/-0.5 C
  • Units: C; F
  • Humidity
  • Principle: Capacitive
  • Measuring Range: 0 to 100% RH
  • Resolution: 0.1% RH
  • Accuracy: +/-2% RH
  • Units: % RH; g/m3; g/kg
  • Pressure
  • Principle: Capacitive
  • Measuring Range: 300 to 1200hPa
  • Resolution: 0.1hPa
  • Accuracy: +/-1.5hPa
  • Unit: hPa
  • Radiation
  • Response Time (95%): <18s
  • Non-Stability (change/year): <1%
  • Non-Linearity (0 to 1,000 W/m2): <1%
  • Directional Error (at 80° with 1,000 W/m2): <20 W/m2
  • Temperature Dependence of Sensitivity: <5% (–10 to +40° C)
  • Tilt Error (at 1000 W/m2): <1%
  • Spectral Range (50% points): 300 to 2,800 nm
  • Measuring Range: 1400 W/m2
  • Altitude: 0 to 60 degrees
  • Azimuth: -10 to +10 degrees
  • Wind Speed
  • Principle: Ultrasonic
  • Measuring Range: 0 to 60m/s
  • Resolution: 0.1m/s
  • Accuracy: +/-0.3m/s or 3% (0 to 35m/s); +/-5% (>35m/s)
  • Response Threshold: 0.3m/s
  • Units: m/s; km/h; mph; kts
  • Wind Direction
  • Principle: Ultrasonic
  • Measuring Range: 0 to 359.9 degrees
  • Resolution: 0.1 degrees
  • Accuracy: +/-3 degrees
  • Response Threshold: 0.3m/s
  • Compass
  • Principle: Integrated Electronic Compass
  • Measuring Range: 0 to 359.9 degrees
  • Resolution: 1.0 degree
  • Technical Data
  • Interface: SDI-12, Modbus
  • Operating Temperature: -50 to +60 C
  • Operating Humidity: 0 to 100% RH
  • Included Cable Length: 10m
  • (1) WS503 Multi-Parameter Weather Sensor
  • (1) 10m sensor cable
  • (1) Operations manual
Questions & Answers
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