MIS220HR

Mustang Neoprene Cold Water Immersion Suits

Mustang Neoprene Cold Water Immersion Suits

Description

The Mustang Neoprene Cold Water Immersion Suits offer flotation and protection agains hypothermia in emergency situations.

Features

  • Non-slip, durable soles
  • Five-fingered insulated gloves for warmth and dexterity
  • USCG - UL1197 - Immersion Suits 160.171 - UCCG/MED SOLAS 2010 approved
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List Price
$449.99
Your Price
$348.75
In Stock

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Why Buy From Fondriest?

Details

The Mustang Neoprene Cold Water Immersion Suit is ideal as a ship abandonment suit for workboats, transport vessels, drilling rigs, supply ships, steamships, and commercial fishermen. It includes a buddy line and lifting harness to increase safety. The five-fingered insulated gloves add warmth and dexterity, and the non-slip, durable soles are included for extra balance. The 5mm retardant neoprene provides flotation and hypothermia protection in extremely cold waters. The SOLAS grade reflective tape serves as added visibility during the night or in foul weather conditions. Additional features include triple-sealed seam construction, ankle adjustments for a better fit, and a water-tight face seal.

Notable Specifications:
  • Adult Small Weight Capacity: 110lbs - 200lbs
  • Adult Universal Weight Capacity: 110lbs - 330lbs
  • Adult Oversized Weight Capacity: 225lbs - 375lbs
What's Included:
  • (1) Cold Water Immersion Suit
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Mustang Neoprene Cold Water Immersion Suits MIS220HR Neoprene cold water immersion suit with harness, adult small
$348.75
In Stock
Mustang Neoprene Cold Water Immersion Suits MIS230HR Neoprene cold water immersion suit with harness, adult universal
$348.75
In Stock
Mustang Neoprene Cold Water Immersion Suits MIS240HR Neoprene cold water immersion suit with harness, adult oversize
$387.50
In Stock
Mustang Neoprene Cold Water Immersion Suits MIS210HR Neoprene cold water immersion suit with harness, chile
$348.75
In Stock

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