Nasco Telescoping Swing Samplers

The Swing Sampler is designed to collect samples from a horizontal flowing stream.

Features

  • Strong fiberglass construction
  • Extends up to 12 or 24 feet
  • Swing jar holder can angle up to 90 degrees
Your Price $139.95
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Nasco
Free Lifetime Tech SupportFree Lifetime Tech Support
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Nasco Telescoping Swing SamplersW1310 Telescoping swing sampler, 6' to 12'
$139.95
Usually ships in 3-5 days
8' to 24' Telescoping Swing Sampler W1366 Telescoping swing sampler, 8' to 24'
$179.95
Usually ships in 3-5 days
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Nasco Swing Sampler Bottles W1244 Case of (12) 960mL bottles, plastic
$41.95
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Nasco Swing Sampler Plastic Clamp W1220 Plastic clamp for 960mL bottle, spare
$9.95
Usually ships in 3-5 days

The Swing Sampler is designed to collect samples from a horizontal flowing stream, such as a river or sewer. The swing jar holder allows for collection angles up to 90 degrees. The sampler is manufactured from telescoping fiberglass poles and extends to 12 or 24 feet.

The Swing Sampler comes with a 960mL polyethylene bottle and the cover has a vinyl liner for leak-proof protection. The bottle is attached to a polyurethane holder and is held in place with a plastic snapper ring that has an adjustable locking device. Other types of bottles may be used but a different type of fastener may be required to hold the bottle in place.

  • (1) Swing sampler
  • (1) Plastic clamp
  • (1) 960mL sampling bottle
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