Nasco Telescoping Swing Samplers

The Swing Sampler is designed to collect samples from a horizontal flowing stream.

Features

  • Strong fiberglass construction
  • Extends up to 12 or 24 feet
  • Swing jar holder can angle up to 90 degrees
Your Price $139.95
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Nasco
Free Lifetime Tech SupportFree Lifetime Tech Support
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Nasco Telescoping Swing SamplersW1310 Telescoping swing sampler, 6' to 12'
$139.95
Usually ships in 3-5 days
8' to 24' Telescoping Swing Sampler W1366 Telescoping swing sampler, 8' to 24'
$179.95
Usually ships in 3-5 days
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Nasco Swing Sampler Bottles W1244 Case of (12) 960mL bottles, plastic
$41.95
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Nasco Swing Sampler Plastic Clamp W1220 Plastic clamp for 960mL bottle, spare
$9.95
Usually ships in 3-5 days

The Swing Sampler is designed to collect samples from a horizontal flowing stream, such as a river or sewer. The swing jar holder allows for collection angles up to 90 degrees. The sampler is manufactured from telescoping fiberglass poles and extends to 12 or 24 feet.

The Swing Sampler comes with a 960mL polyethylene bottle and the cover has a vinyl liner for leak-proof protection. The bottle is attached to a polyurethane holder and is held in place with a plastic snapper ring that has an adjustable locking device. Other types of bottles may be used but a different type of fastener may be required to hold the bottle in place.

  • (1) Swing sampler
  • (1) Plastic clamp
  • (1) 960mL sampling bottle
Questions & Answers
No Questions
Please, mind that only logged in users can submit questions

In The News

Thousands of Mount Everest hikers add to area’s groundwater contamination

Nepal’s Mount Everest is a wonder to behold. Sitting at more than 29,000 feet, many attempt to summit it each year. And though some climbers don’t make it to the top, all of them have an effect on the mountain’s ecosystem. What’s more, say scientists at Ball State University, the quantities of trash and human waste they leave behind are having disgusting effects on water quality downstream. At the bottom of Mount Everest, there are Sherpa communities too poor to afford water treatment plants and their members often drink untreated water straight off the mountain. “You can find almost every kind of waste. Everything from water bottles, batteries, cans, toilet paper,” said Kirsten Nicholson, professor of geological sciences at Ball State.

Read More

Handheld Cyanotoxin Detection Technology Prototype

In the battle against harmful algal blooms (HABs), time is important . The need for laboratory equipment and testing is a serious challenge for water managers. This issue caught the eye of Qingshan Wei , an assistant professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at North Carolina State University . “Our research group is interested in developing low-cost sensors,” Wei told EM . “Recently we have been developing sensors for environmental monitoring, and cyanotoxins came to our attention .” Cyanobacteria, which generate HABs, are becoming a challenge across the US . They are a very serious problem in North Carolina, in part due to the weather.

Read More

Assessing Cumulative Risk From Water Pollutants

New research from scientists at the Environmental Working Group (EWG) shows that an approach that assesses cumulative risk from water contaminants could save lives. EWG senior scientist Tasha Stoiber spoke with EM about how the team developed the innovative new approach . “Our organization has worked extensively on tap water over the years, and an updated version of our tap water database was just released in 2017,” explains Dr. Stoiber. “We've been thinking about new ways to analyze that data.” Right now, the risk from contaminants in water quality is assessed one at a time—but that really doesn't comport with reality.

Read More