W1310

Nasco Telescoping Swing Samplers

Nasco Telescoping Swing Samplers

Description

The Swing Sampler is designed to collect samples from a horizontal flowing stream.

Features

  • Strong fiberglass construction
  • Extends up to 12 or 24 feet
  • Swing jar holder can angle up to 90 degrees
Your Price
$139.95
Usually ships in 3-5 days

Shipping Information
Return Policy
Why Buy From Fondriest?

Details

The Swing Sampler is designed to collect samples from a horizontal flowing stream, such as a river or sewer. The swing jar holder allows for collection angles up to 90 degrees. The sampler is manufactured from telescoping fiberglass poles and extends to 12 or 24 feet.
What's Included:
  • (1) Swing sampler
  • (1) Plastic clamp
  • (1) 960mL sampling bottle
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Nasco Telescoping Swing Samplers W1310 Telescoping swing sampler, 6' to 12'
$139.95
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Nasco Telescoping Swing Samplers W1366 Telescoping swing sampler, 8' to 24'
$179.95
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Nasco Swing Sampler Bottles W1244 Case of (12) 960mL bottles, plastic
$41.95
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Nasco W1220 Plastic clamp for 960mL bottle, spare
$9.95
Usually ships in 3-5 days

Questions & Answers

| Ask a Question
Are the sampling bottles autoclavable?
The bottles are made from a food-grade, high-density polyethylene with a vinyl lined cap to ensure a tight fit. However, they are not sterile nor autoclavable. The Nasco swing sampler can be used with other bottles to fit your needs.
What does autoclavable mean?
If an object is autoclavable, it means that the it can withstand the high pressure and temperature produced in an autoclave. An autoclave is used to sterilize equipment by subjecting it a high pressure steam (15-30 psi and 121-134 degrees Celsius) for 10-20 minutes. The exact pressure/temperature/time required depends on the item being sterilized. The bottle included with the Nasco Swing Sampler is not autoclavable.
Do you sell just the bottle swing/holder with out the pole?
Yes, we do carry the plastic clamps (part #W1220) and the bottles (part #W1244) separately. They can be found under the Accessories tab.
Will the nasco telescoping swing sampler hold a standard 1L glass amber bottle?
The Nasco swing sampler can be used with any bottle that fits inside the adjustable locking ring. The ring has an adjustable internal diameter of 3 7/8 inches to 4 inches. If the bottle doesn't fit within these diameters, you may be able to attach it to the sampler with alterative fasteners of your choice.

Related Products

In The News

Thousands of Mount Everest hikers add to area’s groundwater contamination

Nepal’s Mount Everest is a wonder to behold. Sitting at more than 29,000 feet, many attempt to summit it each year. And though some climbers don’t make it to the top, all of them have an effect on the mountain’s ecosystem. What’s more, say scientists at Ball State University, the quantities of trash and human waste they leave behind are having disgusting effects on water quality downstream. At the bottom of Mount Everest, there are Sherpa communities too poor to afford water treatment plants and their members often drink untreated water straight off the mountain. “You can find almost every kind of waste. Everything from water bottles, batteries, cans, toilet paper,†said Kirsten Nicholson, professor of geological sciences at Ball State.

Read More

Sediment and Tree Rings Reveal Details of 500 Years of Floods—and Human Interference

A 100-year flood sounds to laypeople like something that happens once each century, but the term really just refers to an extreme hydrologic event with a 100-year recurrence interval. In other words, it's a flood whose magnitude reaches a level that has a one percent chance of happening in any given year. This means they can happen more often than that—and a recent study from a team led by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) researchers has revealed that along the Mississippi River, they are happening more frequently. The work is also providing insight into why human interference in the form of projects to channelize, straighten, and bound the water with artificial levees is causing such a notable increase in both the frequency and size of extreme flood events.

Read More

Inside the Struggle to Designate Lake Erie's Water Impaired

Since the mid-1800s, Ohio has been a locus for industry . As the state cranked out steel, rubber, automotive parts, appliances, glassware, and refined oil, its economy grew—but pollution also became a serious problem . Factories dumped refuse into rivers and into Lake Erie, agricultural runoff ended up there, and city sewers also emptied into the lake. By the late 1960s, the Cuyahoga River had caught on fire, and the shores of Lake Erie were lined with dead fish as algal blooms flourished in its waters. The fiery river and the presumed “death†of Lake Erie prompted changes at both the local and national level. Leaders in Cleveland worked to improve the sewage system and monitor water quality more effectively.

Read More