NexSens Gas Discharge Lightning Arrester

Lightning arresters are designed to protect radio, cellular and satellite equipment from harmful static electricity and lightning induced surges.

Features

  • Protects equipment from lightning induced surge currents as high as 5,000 Amps
  • Copper grounding lug with stainless steel set screw enables a secure ground connection
  • Integral N-style connectors allow for connection to standard RF cables
Your Price $160.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
NexSens
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
NexSens Gas Discharge Lightning ArresterA39 Gas discharge lightning arrestor, Type N female connector to Type N female connector
$160.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
NexSens Gas Discharge Lightning Arrester
A39
Gas discharge lightning arrestor, Type N female connector to Type N female connector
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$160.00
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
NexSens RF Extension Cables A35 RF extension cable, Type N male connector to Type N male connector, 2'
$50.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
NexSens A36 6' Micro-Loss RF Cable A36 RF extension cable, Type N male connector to Type N male connector, 6'
$60.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
NexSens RF Extension Cables A31 RF extension cable, Type N male connector to Type N male connector, 10'
$90.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
NexSens A32 20' Low-Loss RF Cable A32 RF extension cable, Type N male connector to Type N male connector, 20'
$130.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
NexSens A33 50' Low-Loss RF Cable A33 RF extension cable, Type N male connector to Type N male connector, 50'
$290.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
NexSens A34 100' Low-Loss RF Cable A34 RF extension cable, Type N male connector to Type N male connector, 100'
$555.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
NexSens RF Extension Cables
A35
RF extension cable, Type N male connector to Type N male connector, 2'
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$50.00
NexSens A36 6' Micro-Loss RF Cable
A36
RF extension cable, Type N male connector to Type N male connector, 6'
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$60.00
NexSens RF Extension Cables
A31
RF extension cable, Type N male connector to Type N male connector, 10'
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$90.00
NexSens A32 20' Low-Loss RF Cable
A32
RF extension cable, Type N male connector to Type N male connector, 20'
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$130.00
NexSens A33 50' Low-Loss RF Cable
A33
RF extension cable, Type N male connector to Type N male connector, 50'
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$290.00
NexSens A34 100' Low-Loss RF Cable
A34
RF extension cable, Type N male connector to Type N male connector, 100'
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$555.00
The A39 gas discharge lightning arrester is designed to protect sensitive communication equipment from static electricity and lightning induced surges that travel on coaxial transmission lines.

Product warranty requires properly grounded gas discharge lightning protection with all A41 Omni or A46 Yagi antenna based 4100-iSIC installations. Note that lightning protection installation requires an additional RF cable and ground kit.
  • (1) Gas discharge lightning arrester
  • (1) Copper grounding lug
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