A11

NexSens A11 Float Charger Kit

NexSens A11 Float Charger Kit

Description

The A11 float charger is designed to provide a continuous charge to the iSIC data logger battery in locations where AC power is available.

Features

  • Delivers a constant 2.25 to 2.3 volts per cell which allows the battery to remain fully charged
  • Electronically regulates current for sealed lead-acid type batteries
  • Standard wall-mount plug-in design for easy installation
Your Price
$189.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days

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Details

The A11 float charger is designed to provide a continuous charge to the iSIC data logger battery in locations where AC power is available. The 15' cable is pre-wired with an MS2 connector for plug-and-play connection to any iSIC data logger.

The float charger delivers a constant 2.25 to 2.3 volts per cell, which allows the battery to remain fully charged. The charger uses a standard wall-mount plug-in design for easy installation, and output is controlled to prevent over charging.
What's Included:
  • (1) 12V 800mA float charger
  • (1) 15' length of pre-wired cable with MS2 connector for connection to iSIC data logger
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
NexSens A11 Float Charger Kit A11 AC float charger kit for iSIC data loggers, 15' cable
$189.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
NexSens A15 Deep Outlet Cover A15 Deep outlet cover (A11)
$59.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
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