NexSens CB-25-SVS Wave Buoy

The CB-25-SVS Wave Buoy by NexSens Technology offers the latest in real-time wave observations in a compact, affordable, and easy to deploy platform.

Features

  • Measures wave height, period & direction
  • Designed for drifting, tethering or mooring applications
  • Integrated SeaView Systems SVS-603 wave sensor
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NexSens CB-25-SVS Wave BuoyCB-25-SVS CB-25-SVS wave buoy
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NexSens CB-25-SVS Wave Buoy CB-25-SVS-C-NA4G CB-25-SVS wave buoy with North American 4G LTE cellular telemetry
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NexSens CB-25-SVS Wave Buoy CB-25-SVS-I CB-25-SVS wave buoy with Iridium satellite telemetry
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NexSens CB-25-SVS Wave Buoy
CB-25-SVS
CB-25-SVS wave buoy
Usually ships in 3-5 days
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NexSens CB-25-SVS Wave Buoy
CB-25-SVS-C-NA4G
CB-25-SVS wave buoy with North American 4G LTE cellular telemetry
Usually ships in 3-5 days
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NexSens CB-25-SVS Wave Buoy
CB-25-SVS-I
CB-25-SVS wave buoy with Iridium satellite telemetry
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The CB-25-SVS Wave Buoy by NexSens Technology offers the latest in real-time wave observations in a compact, affordable, and easy to deploy platform. At 18” hull diameter and less than 30 lb. (13.6kg) weight, it can be used for drifting, tethering or mooring applications. The buoy accurately measures wave height, period, direction, and more using SeaView Systems’ industry-leading SVS-603 sensor, relied upon in buoy networks by NOAA and many others throughout the world. External sensor ports with wet-mate connectors support GPS, meteorological, and water quality sensors for maximum flexibility.

The buoy is constructed of an inner core of cross-linked polyethylene foam with a tough polyurea skin. A rechargeable battery with integrated solar panels power the wave buoy continuously, and all electronics are housed in a quick-removable waterproof package with wet-mate connectors. Three 1.5” pass-through holes facilitate cable routing of underwater sensors.

Available with integrated 4G cellular or Iridium satellite communications, the CB-25-SVS Wave Buoy sends data in real-time to the cloud-based WQData LIVE datacenter. In a basic configuration, this free service allows users to securely access and analyze data, as well as share data through an API or auto-report. Subscription-based tiers of WQData LIVE are also available for advanced reporting, alarming, and data management.

  • Wave Sensor: SeaView Systems SVS-603HRi
  • Available Wave Parameters: Significant wave height, dominant period, wave direction, mean wave direction and more
  • Range: Wave Height: 0.2-20m; Wave Period: 1.5-20 seconds; Wave Direction: 0-360°
  • Resolution: Wave Height: 0.001m; Wave Period: 0.001 seconds; Wave Direction: 0.001°
  • Accuracy: Wave Height: +/- 0.5cm; Wave Period: <1%; Wave Direction: +/-2°
  • Diagnostic Sensors: Internal temperature (-40C to 85C, 0.1C resolution, ±0.3C accuracy); Humidity (0% to 100%, 0.1% resolution, ±4% accuracy from 5 to 95% RH & -20 to 70C); Battery voltage
  • Optional Water Sensors: Surface temperature, single-parameter sensors, multi-parameter sondes
  • Optional Atmospheric Sensors: Single and multi-parameter weather sensors
  • Optional Position Sensor: Marine GNSS receiver or standalone asset tracking device
  • Sensor Interfaces: SDI-12, RS-232 (3 channels), RS-485
  • Sensor Ports: (2) External sensor ports, expandable using splitters
  • Battery: 12 VDC sealed lead acid (SLA) battery, 6.0 A-Hr
  • Solar Power: (3) 4-watt 12 VDC solar panels
  • Serial Interface: Direct RS-485 via USB adapter (for setup)
  • Wi-Fi Interface: 802.11b/g/n (for setup)
  • Cellular: 4G: LTE Bands B2(1900), B4(1700), B5(850), B12(700ac), B13(700c)
  • Iridium Satellite: Short Burst Data (SBD) 1616 MHz to 1626.5 MHz
  • Cloud Datacenter:  WQData LIVE web portal with auto data export to NDBC, GLOS, and others (configurable on web portal)
  • Data Logging: 256MB microSD card (expandable up to 32GB)
  • Hull Dimensions: 18” (45.72cm) outside diameter; 11” (27.94cm) tall
  • Tower Dimensions: 8” (20.32cm) tall, triangular
  • Center Hole Dimension: 5.5" (13.97cm) inside diameter
  • Weight: 30 lbs. (13.61 kg)
  • Net Buoyancy: 25 lbs. (11.34 kg)
  • Hull Material: Cross-linked polyethylene foam with polyurea coating & stainless steel deck
  • Hardware Material: 316 stainless steel
  • Mooring Attachments: (4) 3/8” eye nuts
  • Operating Temperature: -20C to 70°C
  • Warranty: 12 months. See terms at nexsens.com/support/warranty
  • Place of Manufacture: Ohio & Michigan, USA
  • Field Verification: Tested and verified by LimnoTech, Ann Arbor, MI
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