NexSens CB-40 Data Buoy

The CB-40 Data Buoy offers a compact and affordable platform for deploying water quality sondes and other instruments that integrate power and data logging.

Features

  • Integrated 4" diameter stainless steel slotted instrument pipe
  • Supports 1-3 nautical mile light for deployment in navigable waters
  • Lightweight system can be deployed by a single person
Your Price $1,495.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
NexSens
Government and Educational PricingGovernment and Educational Pricing
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
NexSens CB-40 Data BuoyCB-40 Data buoy with polymer-coated foam hull, 40 lb. buoyancy
$1,495.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
NexSens M550 1-3NM Solar Marine Light M550-F-Y Solar marine light with flange mount & 1-3 nautical mile range, 15 flashes per minute, yellow
$595.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days

The CB-40 Data Buoy offers a compact and affordable platform for deploying water quality sondes and other instruments that integrate power and data logging. The lightweight platform can be deployed from small boats, large vessels or even helicopters, making it the ideal choice for applications where water needs to be monitored at a moment’s notice. The buoy can also be used as an underwater float and instrument housing for subsurface deployments.

The buoy is constructed of an inner core of cross-linked polyethylene foam with a tough polyurea skin and stainless steel frame. An optional 1-3 NM solar marine light mounts over the topside access hole, and three eyenuts offer a convenient lifting point. The CB-40 supports a 1, 2, or 3-point mooring via bottom bow shackle and three eyenuts. Optional accessories include chain, shackles and anchors for buoy mooring.

The CB-40 Data Buoy weighs 38 lbs. with no payload and approximately 45 lbs. with integrated solar marine light and water quality sonde. The 4" stainless steel instrument pipe securely houses the instrument and includes slotted holes for water flow. Compatible instruments include YSI 6-Series & EXO sondes, Hydrolab Series 5 & HL sondes, Eureka Sub 2 & Manta 2 sondes, and In-Situ TROLL 9500 instruments.

  • Hull Dimensions: 14" (35.56cm) outside diameter; 20" (50.80cm) tall
  • Instrument Pipe Dimensions: 3.87" (9.83cm) inside diameter; 48" (121.92cm) tall
  • Weight: 38 lbs. (no payload); 45 lbs. (with sonde & solar marine light)
  • Buoyancy: 40 lbs.
  • Hull Material: Cross-linked polyethylene foam with polyurea coating & stainless steel deck
  • Hardware Material: 304 stainless steel
  • Mooring Attachments: 1, 2, or 3 point
Questions & Answers
Are there data logging options for this model?

The instrument deployed in the buoy can have internal logging (i.e. multi-parameter sonde) although there is no data logger option for this model. The CB-50 and larger buoy platforms support NexSens X2 data loggers.

Is telemetry available for this model?

No, the CB-50 and larger buoy platforms can accommodate this feature.

Other than multiparameter sondes, what instruments can be deployed from this platform?

Any submersible instrument with internal power & data logging that fits within a 4” diameter x 48” long pipe could be deployed from this platform.

Is the platform able to house sensitive electronics?

There are no waterproof housing compartments on this platform. The CB-150 and larger buoy platforms can accommodate sensitive electronics inside the data well.

How is this platform used as an underwater float?

The CB-40 can be deployed subsurface with an anchor heavier than the net buoyancy of the deployed equipment. This is useful when monitoring at a fixed distance from the bottom of the water body.

Please, mind that only logged in users can submit questions

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