NexSens DS1402 iButton USB Reader

The DS1402 USB reader provides a direct PC interface for iButton loggers. This allows the user to configure, deploy, view status, and upload data when used with compatible software.

Features

  • 8' USB extension cable provides versatility in configuring and uploading data
  • Plugs directly into any desktop or laptop USB port
  • Consists of Maxim Integrated part numbers DS9490R# and DS1402-RP8+
Your Price $49.95
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NexSens DS1402 iButton USB ReaderDS1402 iButton USB reader with 8' extension cable
$49.95
In Stock
The DS1402 USB reader provides a direct PC interface for iButton loggers. This allows the user to configure, deploy, view status, and upload data when used with compatible software. The 8' USB extension cable provides versatility in configuring and uploading data.
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In The News

A low-cost DIY iButton array tracks lake turnover for Missouri volunteers

When Howard Webb set out to monitor turnover in Whitecliff Quarry Lake, his custom-built system of temperature sensors worked perfectly. Until the muskrats showed up. Webb, a volunteer with the Lakes of Missouri Volunteer Program , devised an inexpensive array to monitor the lake in St. Louis’ Crestwood suburb. His design for looking at the effect of temperature turnover on algae cycling centered on iButtons, small metal loggers that were very reliable, but not waterproof. That meant Webb had to find an equally inexpensive way to keep them dry. The solution? Small Nalgene water bottles to hold the loggers. Muskrats, however, mistook the bottles - which became covered in algae - for food, tearing into them and flooding the iButtons. “We thought, ‘Let’s give this a try.

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Robotic Fish May Reduce Live Fish Testing Near Hydroelectric Plants

Each year in Germany, as many as 450,000 living fish undergo live animal experiments to test how fish-friendly hydroelectric power plants in the country are. The idea is to discover how readily the fish can move through hydroelectric turbine installations in order to ultimately reduce mortality rates. Of course, subjecting live fish to a potentially deadly test to save others is a bitter irony. And it's one that a team of scientists from the RETERO research project hopes to eventually mitigate with a robotic fish for testing. EM corresponded with Olivier Cleynen and Stefan Hoerner from the University of Magdeburg about the complex flow conditions that set the parameters for the project.

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Mobile HAB Lab, Citizen Scientists Building Awareness

News stories about dogs getting sick from harmful algal blooms (HABs) in lakes have caused worry among members of the public this summer more than once. But Regional Science Consortium (RSC) Executive Director Dr. Jeanette Schnars and a dedicated team are bringing awareness about HABs to the public with the Mobile HAB Lab. “We just launched the HAB Citizen Scientists program this year,” explains Dr. Schnars. “It helps us work with people, especially people who spend time at marinas frequently, that are out there all season long.” The season for boaters at Presque Isle, where RSC is located, starts in mid-May and usually continues through the beginning or middle of October.

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