NexSens DS1402 iButton USB Reader

The DS1402 USB reader provides a direct PC interface for iButton loggers. This allows the user to configure, deploy, view status, and upload data when used with compatible software.

Features

  • 8' USB extension cable provides versatility in configuring and uploading data
  • Plugs directly into any desktop or laptop USB port
  • Consists of Maxim Integrated part numbers DS9490R# and DS1402-RP8+
Your Price $49.95
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NexSens DS1402 iButton USB ReaderDS1402 iButton USB reader with 8' extension cable
$49.95
In Stock
The DS1402 USB reader provides a direct PC interface for iButton loggers. This allows the user to configure, deploy, view status, and upload data when used with compatible software. The 8' USB extension cable provides versatility in configuring and uploading data.
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