NexSens DS9093N iButton Keychain Fob

Keychain Fobs offer a simple way to carry iButton temperature loggers. Simply snap the temperature logger into the keychain hole, and it's ready to go.

Features

  • Each pack comes with (5) Keychain Fobs for use with multiple iButton loggers
  • Fobs can easily be attached to car keys, wall hooks, rope, etc.
  • iButton loggers can interface to the PC while still attached to the Keychain Fobs
Your Price $14.95
In Stock
NexSens
Government and Educational PricingGovernment and Educational Pricing
Free Lifetime Tech SupportFree Lifetime Tech Support
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
NexSens DS9093N iButton Keychain FobDS9093N iButton keychain fob, 5 pack
$14.95
In Stock
This is a low cost and effective way to mount the iButton logger. The holder can then be attached to car keys, wall hooks, rope, etc. It can also be used as a convenient way to transport temperature loggers on person. When used with the DS1402 USB adapter, iButton loggers can interface to the PC without removing them from the keychain.
  • (5) iButton keychain fobs
Questions & Answers
No Questions
Please, mind that only logged in users can submit questions

In The News

A low-cost DIY iButton array tracks lake turnover for Missouri volunteers

When Howard Webb set out to monitor turnover in Whitecliff Quarry Lake, his custom-built system of temperature sensors worked perfectly. Until the muskrats showed up. Webb, a volunteer with the Lakes of Missouri Volunteer Program , devised an inexpensive array to monitor the lake in St. Louis’ Crestwood suburb. His design for looking at the effect of temperature turnover on algae cycling centered on iButtons, small metal loggers that were very reliable, but not waterproof. That meant Webb had to find an equally inexpensive way to keep them dry. The solution? Small Nalgene water bottles to hold the loggers. Muskrats, however, mistook the bottles - which became covered in algae - for food, tearing into them and flooding the iButtons. “We thought, ‘Let’s give this a try.

Read More

Restoring Native Brook Trout in North Carolina

The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission ’s Inland Fisheries Division has been working to restore brook trout in the state. Coldwater research coordinator Jacob Rash, who works with the brook trout team technicians on this project, spoke to EM about the work. “In North Carolina, brook trout are our only native trout species,” explains Mr. Rash. “With that come biological and ecological considerations as well as cultural importance. A lot of folks here grew up fishing for brook trout with their relatives, so it's an important species that we work to try to conserve. We've done quite a bit of work to figure out where those brook trout populations are and what they are, in terms of genetics.

Read More

Robotic Fish May Reduce Live Fish Testing Near Hydroelectric Plants

Each year in Germany, as many as 450,000 living fish undergo live animal experiments to test how fish-friendly hydroelectric power plants in the country are. The idea is to discover how readily the fish can move through hydroelectric turbine installations in order to ultimately reduce mortality rates. Of course, subjecting live fish to a potentially deadly test to save others is a bitter irony. And it's one that a team of scientists from the RETERO research project hopes to eventually mitigate with a robotic fish for testing. EM corresponded with Olivier Cleynen and Stefan Hoerner from the University of Magdeburg about the complex flow conditions that set the parameters for the project.

Read More