NexSens DS9096P iButton Adhesive Pads

Adhesive Pads provide a low-cost option for securing iButton loggers to various environments.

Features

  • Rugged adhesive provides long-term monitoring solution in most interior and exterior applications
  • Double-coated acrylic VHB foam tape attaches to virtually any smooth surface
  • Each pack comes with (12) Adhesive Pads for use with multiple iButton loggers
Your Price $4.95
In Stock
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NexSens DS9096P iButton Adhesive PadsDS9096P iButton adhesive pads, 12 ea.
$4.95
In Stock
NexSens Adhesive Pads are made of white, double-coated acrylic VHB foam tape that is die-cut to match the diameter of iButton loggers. The pads allow iButton's to be attached to virtually any smooth surface, offering an excellent long-term monitoring solution in most interior and exterior applications.
  • (12) iButton adhesive pads
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In The News

A low-cost DIY iButton array tracks lake turnover for Missouri volunteers

When Howard Webb set out to monitor turnover in Whitecliff Quarry Lake, his custom-built system of temperature sensors worked perfectly. Until the muskrats showed up. Webb, a volunteer with the Lakes of Missouri Volunteer Program , devised an inexpensive array to monitor the lake in St. Louis’ Crestwood suburb. His design for looking at the effect of temperature turnover on algae cycling centered on iButtons, small metal loggers that were very reliable, but not waterproof. That meant Webb had to find an equally inexpensive way to keep them dry. The solution? Small Nalgene water bottles to hold the loggers. Muskrats, however, mistook the bottles - which became covered in algae - for food, tearing into them and flooding the iButtons. “We thought, ‘Let’s give this a try.

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Measuring Rising Floodwaters with the USGS

All year long the US Geological Survey (USGS) in North Dakota and South Dakota monitors water levels, but during times of flooding, all eyes are on the team. EM spoke to USGS data chief Chris Laveau about the monitoring efforts. “The US Geological Survey in North Dakota and South Dakota is one entity, so we monitor the flooding in both states,” explains Mr. Laveau. “The role is to provide continuous information on water level, we call that gauge height or stage, and we also provide continuous information at a lot of locations on stream flow, typically called discharge. We do that year round but, obviously, during a flood event it garners more attention.

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