NexSens DS9096P iButton Adhesive Pads

Adhesive Pads provide a low-cost option for securing iButton loggers to various environments.

Features

  • Rugged adhesive provides long-term monitoring solution in most interior and exterior applications
  • Double-coated acrylic VHB foam tape attaches to virtually any smooth surface
  • Each pack comes with (12) Adhesive Pads for use with multiple iButton loggers
Your Price $4.95
In Stock
NexSens
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
NexSens DS9096P iButton Adhesive PadsDS9096P iButton adhesive pads, 12 ea.
$4.95
In Stock
NexSens Adhesive Pads are made of white, double-coated acrylic VHB foam tape that is die-cut to match the diameter of iButton loggers. The pads allow iButton's to be attached to virtually any smooth surface, offering an excellent long-term monitoring solution in most interior and exterior applications.
  • (12) iButton adhesive pads
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